Hollis DE-794 - History

Hollis DE-794 - History

Hollis

(DE-794: dp. 1400; 1. 306'; b. 36'10"; dr. 9'5"; s. 24 k.; cpl. 186; a. 3 3", 4 1.1", 8 20mm., 2 dct., 8 dcp., 1 dcp.(h.h.); 3 21" tt.; cl. Buckley)

Hollis (DE-794) was launched by Consolidated Steel Corp., Orange, Tex., 11 September 1943, sponsored by Mrs. Hermione C. Hollis, widow of Ensign Hollis; and commis610ned 24 January 1944 at Orange, Lt. Comdr. G. D. Kissam in command.

Following shakedown in the Atlantic, Hollis made two escort voyages along the East Coast and then reported to Quonset Point, R.I., to assist in sonic research. The aim was to find countermeasures for the German acoustic torpedo, and the destroyer escort remained on this important duty until 28 May, when she sailed to Casablanca in a carrier screen. Returning to New York 17 June, Hollis was soon at sea again, this time as part of an escort and hunter-killer unit. She operated from July to mid-August escorting convoys in the Mediterranean, and escorted a convoy to the southern France invasion area 15 August as allied troops stormed ashore. In the months that followed, as the offensive gained momentum, Hollis continued to act as an escort in the Mediterranean, ensuring the flow of vital supplies and men. She sailed for the United States 28 December, and arrived 18 January to undergo conversion to a high-speed transport at Philadelphia Navy Yard.

Fitted out to carry amphibious ~assault troops, Hollis was reclassified APD~6, 24 January 1945, and conducted her shakedown in April and May off the Atlantic coast. Sailing from Miami 10 May, the ship transited the Panama C,anal and sailed for Pearl Harbor and the Pacific war. She arrived 30 May and immediately began trainiDg with Underwater Demolition Teams, the Navy's famed "frogmen", on Maui island. Converted to a UDT flagship, Hollis sailed to Eniwetok and Guam as the Japanese were accepting surrender terms, arriving Apra Harbor 23 August 1945.

Hollis, now flagship for Pacific UDT forces, sailed to Tokyo Bay to assist in the occupation, arriving 1 September. There she witnessed the formal surrender ceremonies of the Japanese Empire the next day. Following occupation duties the ship sailed for San Diego, where she arrived 23 October, and thence via the Panama Canal to Boston. Arriving 15 February 1946, the transport spent 4 months at Charleston, S.C., before arriving Green Cove Springs Fla., 13 October 1946. Hollis decommissioned 5 May 1947 and entered the Atlantic Reserve Fleet.

With the increase in fleet strength brought about by the Korean conflict, Hollis recommissioned 6 April 1951 and conducted shakedown training out of Norfolk The ship sailed from her home port, Little Creek, Va., 8 October to take part in amphibious exercises in the Caribbean and on the coast of North Carolina, returning 20 November.

For the next 5 years Hollis continued to participate in amphibious exercises, antisubmarine training, and maneuvers. In 1954 and 1955 she served briefly as school ship for Fleet Sonar School, Key West. In 1954 she took part in a North Atlantic cold weather exercise off Labrador, and in 1955 her schedule included a month of NROTC midshipman training.

Hollis arrived Green Cove Springs, Fla., 17 July 1956. and decommissioned there 16 October 195ff. She remains in the Atlantic Reserve Fleet, berthed at present in Orange, Tex.

Hollis received one battle star for World War II service.


Girl, Wash Your Timeline

Rachel Hollis, the best-selling author and motivational speaker, built a blockbuster business sharing her “authentic” self. Then things got a little too real.

May 14 was supposed to mark Rachel Hollis’s return to her happy place: a stage in front of an adoring audience.

That was the day that Rise, her self-improvement company’s conference for women, was scheduled to begin in Austin, Texas. At least 100 people would attend in person, and more than 2,000 had registered by mid-April to join online. It would be a fraction of her usual crowd — nearly 50,000 people logged on for a virtual event in May 2020 — but would put her on track to business as usual.

But in early April, Ms. Hollis, the 38-year-old author of the New York Times best-selling books “Girl, Wash Your Face” and “Girl, Stop Apologizing,” posted a video to TikTok that jarred many of her devoted fans.

She recounted that while speaking extemporaneously during a livestream, she mentioned her twice-weekly housekeeper who “cleans the toilets.” One commenter had told Ms. Hollis she was “privileged” and “unrelatable.”

“No, sis, literally everything I do in my life is to live a life that most people can’t relate to,” Ms. Hollis said, relaying her reaction to the commenter. “Literally every woman I admire in history was unrelatable.” She added a caption offering examples: Harriet Tubman, Oprah Winfrey and others.

This didn’t go over well, coming from a white woman who achieved fame in 2015 after posting a bikini photograph from Cancún, Mexico, that revealed her pregnancy stretch marks.

Some followers had already felt betrayed by Ms. Hollis and her husband and business partner, Dave Hollis — close collaborators on daily, intimate, family-focused content — after they announced last spring that they were getting a divorce.

Now, online critics began to examine Ms. Hollis’s words, gestures and history in Zapruderian detail.

Reducing a domestic worker to someone who “cleans the toilet,” said Louiza Doran, an antiracism and anti-oppression educator, in an Instagram Live dissection of Ms. Hollis’s TikTok post, was “the most disgusting capitalistic, privileged flex that was so quick, but it said so much about how she as a human being views the power dynamic and the social hierarchy.”

Ms. Hollis, who declined to comment for this article, issued an apology, blaming her “team” for her slowness in addressing the matter. She followed up, more contritely: “I know I have disappointed so many people, myself included, and I take full accountability.”

About 100,000 Instagram followers have dropped her, and Ms. Hollis canceled an upcoming personal development seminar on YouTube. Her company, which also offers podcasts, life-coaching and inspirational products, postponed the May conference until Labor Day. Overnight, its leader had been put in a very unhappy, and unfamiliar, place: of abrupt online disavowal.


Contents

Ralph Hollis was born on 10 September 1906 in Crawfordville, Georgia. He served in the navy from 1923–26. From 1926 to 1933, he was driver-pump operator with the Palm Beach Fire Dept, then became a lieutenant in the Palm Beach Police Department in charge of radio communications. He was appointed Ensign in the United States Naval Reserve on 21 November 1934 and was called to active duty in May 1941. After attending a special course in communications, Ensign Hollis reported to battleship USS Arizona in September and was promoted to Lieutenant (Junior Grade) on 15 November. Serving as communications officer on board the Arizona, Lt. Hollis was killed during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1941.


Related Research Articles

USS Du Pont (DD�) was a Wickes-class destroyer in the United States Navy during World War II, later reclassified as AG-80. She was the second ship named for Rear Admiral Samuel Francis Du Pont.

USS Crosby (DD�) was a Wickes-class destroyer in the United States Navy during World War II, later reclassified as APD-17. She was named for Admiral Peirce Crosby.

USS Osmond Ingram (DD-255/AVD𔃇/APD-35) was a Clemson-class destroyer in the United States Navy during World War II. She was named for Osmond Ingram.

USS Sutton (DE-771) was a Cannon-class destroyer escort built for the United States Navy during World War II. She served in the Atlantic Ocean and provided escort service against submarine and air attack for Navy vessels and convoys.

USS Cowie (DD-632), a Gleaves-class destroyer, is the only ship of the United States Navy to be named for Rear Admiral Thomas Jefferson Cowie.

USS PC-1136 was a PC-461-class submarine chaser built for the United States Navy during World War II. Shortly after the end of the war, she was renamed USS PCC-1136 when she was reclassified as a combat communications control ship. In 1956, she was renamed Galena (PC-1136), becoming the third U.S. Navy vessel so named, but never saw active service under that name.

USS Hayter (DE-212/APD-80), a Buckley-class destroyer escort of the United States Navy, was named in honor of Lieutenant Commander Hubert M. Hayter (1901�), who was killed in action, while serving aboard the cruiser USS New Orleans during the Battle of Tassafaronga on 30 November 1942. Lieutenant Commander Hayter was serving as damage control officer when New Orleans received a torpedo hit, and as Central Station, his battle post, filled with asphyxiating gas he ordered all men without masks to leave the compartment giving his own to a partially stricken seaman. After clearing the compartment of all personnel, Lt. Cmdr. Hayter was finally overcome by the fumes. For this extraordinary act of heroism he was posthumously awarded the Navy Cross.

USS Dextrous (AM-341) was an Auk-class minesweeper acquired by the United States Navy for the dangerous task of removing mines from minefields laid in the water to prevent ships from passing.

USS Chief (AM-315) was an Auk-class minesweeper acquired by the United States Navy for the dangerous task of removing mines from minefields laid in the water to prevent ships from passing, and named after the word "chief," the head or leader of a group.

USS Speed (AM-116) was an Auk-class minesweeper acquired by the United States Navy for the dangerous task of removing mines from minefields laid in the water to prevent ships from passing.

USS Hemminger (DE-746) was a Cannon-class destroyer escort built for the United States Navy during World War II. She served in the Pacific Ocean and provided escort service against submarine and air attack for Navy vessels and convoys. She was named in honor of Cyril Franklin Hemminger who was killed during the Battle of Savo Island.

USS Herbert C. Jones (DE-137) was an Edsall-class destroyer escort built for the U.S. Navy during World War II. She served in the Atlantic Ocean and provided destroyer escort protection against submarine and air attack for Navy vessels and convoys.

USS Fessenden (DE-142/DER-142) was an Edsall-class destroyer escort built for the U.S. Navy during World War II. She served in the Atlantic Ocean and the Pacific Ocean and provided destroyer escort protection against submarine and air attack for Navy vessels and convoys.

USS Howard D. Crow (DE-252) was an Edsall-class destroyer escort built for the U.S. Navy during World War II. She served in the Atlantic Ocean the Pacific Ocean and provided destroyer escort protection against submarine and air attack for Navy vessels and convoys.

USS Swenning (DE-394) was an Edsall-class destroyer escort built for the U.S. Navy during World War II. She served in the Atlantic Ocean and the Pacific Ocean and provided destroyer escort protection against submarine and air attack for Navy vessels and convoys.

USS Cockrill (DE-398) was an Edsall-class destroyer escort built for the United States Navy during World War II. She served in the Atlantic Ocean and the Pacific Ocean and provided protection against submarine and air attack for Navy vessels and convoys.

USS Counsel (AM-165) was an Admirable-class minesweeper built for the U.S. Navy during World War II. She was built to clear minefields in offshore waters, and served the Navy in the Pacific Ocean.

USS Key (DE-348) was a John C. Butler-class destroyer escort acquired by the U.S. Navy during World War II. Her primary purpose was to escort and protect ships in convoy. Her other tasks included patrol and radar picket. Post-war, she returned home proudly with one battle star to her credit.

USS Hollis (DE-794/APD-86) was a Buckley-class destroyer escort of the United States Navy, named in honor of Ensign Ralph Hollis (1906�), who was killed on the battleship Arizona during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor.


Military people similar to or like Robert Uhlmann

Killed during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor of 7 December 1941. Born in Louisville, Kentucky, at age 22 Menges enlisted in the Naval Reserve as seaman second class at Robertson, Missouri on 3 July 1939. Wikipedia

Officer in the United States Navy who was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions during the attack on Pearl Harbor. Born on January 21, 1918, at Los Angeles, California and enlisted in the United States Naval Reserve May 14, 1935. Wikipedia

American killed during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. The first Alabamian killed in World War II, and one of the first Americans to die in the Pacific during World War II. Wikipedia

Sailor in the United States Navy who, as a chief petty officer, received the United States military's highest decoration, the Medal of Honor, for his actions during the attack on Pearl Harbor in World War II. Exposed position throughout the attack, despite being repeatedly wounded. Wikipedia

United States Navy sailor who was stationed on the during the attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on December 7, 1941. He posthumously received the Medal of Honor for his actions during the battle. Wikipedia

United States Navy officer killed in action during the attack on Pearl Harbor for whom two U.S. Navy ships were named. Born in Bismarck, North Dakota on 5 November 1899. Wikipedia

United States Navy captain who served during World War I and was killed while he was in command of a battleship during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in World War II. He posthumously received the Medal of Honor for "conspicuous devotion to duty, extraordinary courage, and complete disregard of his own life." Wikipedia

Officer in the United States Navy who received the Medal of Honor for heroism during the attack on Pearl Harbor. Jackson C. Pharris grew up in Columbus, Georgia, the oldest of five children. Wikipedia

United States Navy sailor who was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions during the attack on Pearl Harbor. Born in Massillon, Ohio on July 13, 1915 and enlisted in the United States Navy on April 18, 1938. Wikipedia

United States Navy four-star admiral who was the commander in chief of the United States Pacific Fleet (CINCPACFLT) during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. Removed from that command after the attack, in December 1941, and was reverted back to his permanent two-star rank of rear admiral due to no longer holding a four-star assignment. Wikipedia

Captain in the United States Navy who received the Medal of Honor for his heroism during the attack on Pearl Harbor. Born in Washington, D.C., on March 6, 1894. Wikipedia

The USS Arizona Memorial, at Pearl Harbor in Honolulu, Hawaii, marks the resting place of 1,102 of the 1,177 sailors and Marines killed on during the attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, and commemorates the events of that day. The attack on Pearl Harbor led to the United States' involvement in World War II. Wikipedia

Named in honor of Ensign Edward M. Bates (19 September 1919 – 7 December 1941), who was killed on board during the attack on Pearl Harbor. Launched on 6 June 1943 at the Bethlehem-Hingham Shipyard, Inc., Hingham, Massachusetts sponsored by Mrs. Elizabeth Mason Bates, mother of Ensign Bates and commissioned on 12 September 1943, with Lieutenant Commander E. H. Maher, USNR in command. Wikipedia

Japanese spy in Hawaii before the attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. A 1933 graduate of the Imperial Japanese Naval Academy at Etajima (graduating at the top of his class), Yoshikawa served briefly at sea aboard the armored cruiser Asama as well as submarines. Wikipedia

Named in honor of Ensign John C. England (1920&ndash1941), who was killed in action aboard the battleship during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1941. Feat unparalleled in the history of antisubmarine warfare. Wikipedia

Vice admiral in the United States Navy, best known for his salvage of ships sunk in the attack on Pearl Harbor. Born in Washburn, North Dakota. Wikipedia

Observed annually in the United States on December 7, to remember and honor the 2,403 Americans who were killed in the Japanese surprise attack on Pearl Harbor in Hawaii on December 7, 1941, which led to the United States declaring war on Japan the next day and thus entering World War II. In 1994, the United States Congress, by, designated December 7 of each year as National Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day. Wikipedia

United States Navy officer during World War II. Killed during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor while stationed at Kaneohe Bay Naval Air Station. Wikipedia

Buckley-class destroyer escort of the United States Navy, named in honor of Ensign Ralph Hollis (1906–1941), who was killed on the battleship Arizona during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. Launched by Consolidated Steel Corp., Orange, Texas, on 11 September 1943 sponsored by Mrs. Hermione C. Hollis, widow of Ensign Hollis and commissioned on 24 January 1944 at Orange, Lieutenant Commander G. D. Kissam in command. Wikipedia

Of the United States Navy, named after Ensign Benjamin R. Marsh, Jr., USNR, who was killed on board the battleship during the attack on Pearl Harbor. Laid down on 23 June 1943 at the Defoe Shipbuilding Company in Bay City, Michigan. Wikipedia

Named in honor of Ensign Lee Fox (1920&ndash1941), who was killed in action during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, on 7 December 1941. Laid down on 1 March 1943 at the Bethlehem-Hingham Shipyard, Inc., in Hingham, Massachusetts launched on 29 May 1943, sponsored by Mrs. Lee Fox, mother of Ensign Fox and commissioned on 30 August 1943, with Lieutenant Commander W. C. Jennings in command. Wikipedia

United States Navy rear admiral and a recipient of America's highest military decoration—the Medal of Honor—for his actions in World War II during the attack on Pearl Harbor. Born October 15, 1899, a native of Laddonia, Missouri and entered the United States Naval Academy in July 1919, after a year at the University of Missouri and World War I service in the Army. Wikipedia

Highly decorated officer in the United States Navy with the rank of Vice Admiral. Decorated with Navy Cross, the United States military's second-highest decoration awarded for valor. Wikipedia

Highly decorated officer in the United States Navy with the rank of Vice Admiral. Sunk during the Battle of Tassafaronga in November 1942. Wikipedia

Decorated officer in the United States Navy with the rank of Vice Admiral. A graduate of the Naval Academy and participant of several conflicts, he distinguished himself during World War II as Commander, Cruiser Task Force during the Battles of the Coral Sea and Midway in May and June 1942. Wikipedia

United States Navy military Band that is attached to the United States Pacific Fleet based at Naval Station Pearl Harbor. It performs at civilian/military ceremonies, military parades, and unit/community events. Wikipedia

Highly decorated officer in the United States Navy with the rank of vice admiral. A son of Rear Admiral Richard P. Leary, he distinguished himself during World War I while on the staff of Commander, U.S. Naval Forces in Europe under Admiral William Sims and received the Navy Cross, the United States Navy's second-highest decoration awarded for valor in combat. Wikipedia

Decorated officer of the United States Navy with the rank of four-star Admiral. Credited with the idea that twin-engined Army bombers could be launched from an aircraft carrier. Wikipedia

Highly decorated officer in the United States Navy with the rank of Rear Admiral. Trained as submarine commander and distinguished himself as Commanding officer of submarine USS K-2 during World War I and received Navy Cross, the United States Navy second-highest decoration awarded for valor in combat. Wikipedia

Of the United States Navy, named for Captain Franklin Van Valkenburgh (1888–1941), captain of the battleship when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor. Laid down on 15 November 1942 at Chickasaw, Alabama, by the Gulf Shipbuilding Corp. launched on 19 December 1943, sponsored by Mrs. Marguerite Van Valkenburgh, widow of Capt. Van Valkenburgh and commissioned at the Alabama State Docks, Mobile, Alabama, on 2 August 1944, Commander Alexander B. Coxe, Jr., in command. Wikipedia


Pearl Harbor Heroes

The following ships were named in honor of Pearl Harbor Heroes.

Ship NameDesignation and Hull Number
AUSTIN DE 15
BARBER DE 161
BATES DE 68
BENNIONDD 662
BEVERLY W. REID DE 722
BOOTH DE 170
BOWERS DE 637
BRACKETT DE 41
BUCKLEY DE 51
CALLAGHAN DD 792
CALLAGHAN DD 994
CASSIN YOUNG DD 793
CHARLES LAWRENCE DE 53
CHRISTOPHER DE 100
CHUNG-HOON DDG 93
CLAUDE V RICKETTS DDG 5
CLOUES DE 265
CONNOLLY DE 306
CROWLEY DE 303
CURTS FFG 38
DANIEL T GRIFFIN DE 54
DARBY DE 218
DAVIS DD 937
DAY DE 225
DENNIS DE 405
EDWARD C DALY DE 17
EMERY DE 28
ENGLAND DE 635
ENGLAND DLG 22
ENGLISH DD 696
FINNEGAN DE 307
FLAHERTY DE 135
FOGG DE 57
FORMOE DE 509
FOSS DE 59
FREDERICK C DAVIS DE 136
GANTNER DE 60
GEORGE W INGRAM DE 62
GOSSELIN DE 710
HALLORAN DE 305
HARMON DE 678
HARVESON DE 316
HAVERFIELD DE 393
HAYTER DE 212
HERBERT C JONES DE 137
HILL DE 141
HOLLIS DE 794
HOWARD D CROW DE 252
HUBBARD DE 211
HUGH W. HADLEY DD 774
IRA JEFFERY DE 63
J RICHARD WARD DE 243
JAMES E CRAIG DE 201
JOHN FINN DDG 113
JOHN L WILLIAMSON DE 370
JORDAN DE 204
KEPPLER DD 765
KIDD DD 661
KIDD DDG 993 ex DD 993
KIDD DDG 100
KIRKPATRICK DE 318
LAKE DE 301
LAMONS DE 743
LEE FOX DE 65
LeHARDY DE 20
LEOPOLD DE 319
LOWE DE 325
LOY DE 160
MANLOVE DE 36
MANNING DE 199
MARSH DE 699
McCANDLESS FFT 1084 ex FF 1084 ex DE 1084
McCLELLAND DE 750
MENGES DE 320
MERRILL DE 392
MILLER DE 1091
MOORE DE 240
MOSLEY DE 321
NEUENDORF DE 200
NEWMAN DE 205
O'NEILL DE 188
OTTERSTETTER DE 244
PETERSON DE 152
PHARRIS DE 1094
PRIDE DE 323
RALL DE 304
REEVES DE 156
REGISTER DE 233
RICHEY DE 385
ROSS DDG 71
SANDERS DE 40
SAVAGE DE 386
SCHMITT DE 676
SCOTT DE 214
SEDERSTROM DE 31
SMARTT DE 257
SOLAR DE 221
SPANGENBERG DE 223
STERN DE 187
STOCKDALE DE 399
SWENNING DE 394
THOMAS J GARY DE 326
TOMICH DE 242
UHLMANN DD 687
VAN VALKENBURGH DD 656
WALTER B. COBB DE 596
WALTER S BROWN DE 258
WEAVER DE 741
WEEDEN DE 797
WILLIAM C MILLER DE 259
WILLIAM M. HOBBY DE 236
WILLIAM T. POWELL DE 213
WILLIS DE 395
WYMAN DE 38

If a ship is missing from this list or if no page is associated with a ship (ie, the ship's name is not an active link), then either contact the Curator or edit this page yourself and fix it. See Editing the Alphabetical List of Ships for detailed information on editing this page.


History

The history of Hollis Township is one of agriculture, mining and the Illinois River.

Just how important the mining was is reflected in this note from "The Atlas Map of Peoria County, 1873": Along the bluff on the line of the Toledo, Peoria and Warsaw Railroad is some the most valuable coal mines in the state. (emphasis added) (The railroad later replaced Warsaw with Western in its name and was commonly referred to as the TP&W.)

Township Beginnings

Hollis Township can date its origin to 1849 when an election established township government for the area formerly known as the Lafayette Precinct of the Northwest Territory. The first annual meeting was held on April 2, 1850 at which time it was named for Denzil Hollis, an early settler who came to the area from England in 1832.

The naming of the township was not just honorary as Mr. Hollis was charged with being the overseer of the poor, a township function still in place today (known now as general assistance). He later served as overseer of the roads. He died in 1856 and was buried near his home. Because the burial site was not well maintained over the years, a contingent of local residents, led by Wilbur Stranz, Raymond Junker and John Gerdes, took steps in 1964 to remove Mr. Hollis' remains with reburial in the Maple Ridge Cemetery.

Before White Settlers/Indian Tribes and Names

The history of Hollis Township did not begin with the first white settlers. However, little or no written record is available detailing the time before 1832. If general patterns are accurate, it is likely that the Kickapoo and Potawatomi Indian tribes were in the Peoria area in the 18th century.

In Hollis, the Potawatomi were likely the dominant Indians. The seemingly abrupt change from Indian culture to that of the white settlers occurred in 1832 because of an order by the Illinois governor in that year that Indians should be removed from the state.

Many of the Potawatomi eventually settled in Oklahoma and Kansas. Some later returned to the southern Great Lakes.

The name, Potawatomi, was once thought to mean "men of the place of the fire." However, later investigation has shown that this name was the result of miscommunication between an early French diplomat and his Huron Indian guides. Even though the Potawatomi originally called themselves the Neshnabek, the incorrect name stuck.

The Potawatomi tribe spoke the Algonquain language and were primarily hunters and fishermen. The Potawatomi, along with the Ottawa (Odawa) and Chippewa (Ojibwa), formed the Anishinabek peoples.

In Kingston Mines (adjacent to Hollis Township) evidence has been found of a Mississippian culture during pre-Columbian times.

The origin of an Indian word, Tuscarora, to define a population center in Hollis Township has never been discovered. The Tuscarora Indians were native to the eastern portion of the United States, primarily in North Carolina and New York. The word means, "hemp gatherer." It is likely that an early white settler in Hollis came from the east or was familiar with "Tuscarora" and used it without any direct connection to the tribe.

Cemeteries

Maple Ridge Cemetery is, by far, the largest of the five documented cemeteries in Hollis Township. It is located close to the LaMarsh Baptist Church near the corner of Maple Ridge and Harkers Corners roads.

The other four cemeteries that have been identified include:

  • Goodwin - only one stone remaining when discovered in 1972.
  • Hendrick - in section 6 near the corner of Lancaster and Harkers Corners roads.
  • Hollis - recently cleared and now maintained located on the bluff near the current US Route 24 and Illinois Route 9 intersection.
  • Jones Family - on Wheeler Road in section 16.

The Coal Mining Business

The cemeteries are silent reminders of the energy the European settlers brought to the area we now call Hollis Township. That energy was best reflected in the mining operations that started in 1832 when the first mine was opened on LaMarsh Creek. Coal from that mine was hauled by oxen to Egman Lake (later named Kingston Lake) where it was loaded on boats for St. Louis.

At one point, there were four commercial mines operating and numerous private mines. The four mines carried the names of Crescent Mines 1 and 2 and Newsam Brothers Mines 5 and 6. One of the private mines was located near today's route 9 and 24 intersection. In 1853, William Stackpole set out 15,000 apple trees at that location, giving it the name we know today: Orchard Mines.

The most dramatic mine-related event was a tragedy that struck on Feb 20, 1929. During that era, a train delivered workers from Peoria to the mines in Hollis Township. It had stops in South Peoria, Bartonville, Tuscarora (earlier known as Bismark), Hollis and finally Pekin. In the winter of 1929, that train derailed near Tuscarora, killing six and injuring 150, thirty very seriously. Working the mines was dangerous enough being injured or killed getting to the mines was probably not something the miners considered until 1929.

The mines located in Hollis Township and Peoria County also provided foundations for the road beds in the area. But it was not shale.

Shale is a naturally occurring sedimentary rock that was originally clay it splits readily into layers. While there are thin layers of red shale (or claystone) in Illinois, nearly all the shale near the surface in Peoria County is gray to black in color. Most shale returns to clay upon exposure to moisture, so it is unlikely that shale was used for roads.

More likely was the use of “red dog” on the roads. Red dog is burned shale and clay recovered from waste (gob) piles of abandoned coal mines. When waste piles containing coal are subjected to repeated wetting and drying, they often catch fire by spontaneous combustion. Heat from these fires bakes shale or clay like a brick, resulting in a hard and resistant material usable on roads. Using the material for such purposes has been a good way to get rid of gob piles which are eyesores and environmental nuisances.

(Information provided John Nelson of the Illinois State Geological Survey.)

Township Communities

Tuscarora can be found on maps, but it was never formally laid out. Other areas were platted, including Hollis (laid out on Sept. 8, 1868), Kingston (Nov. 15, 1838) and Mapleton (May 18, 1868). Mapleton's population was up to 100 by 1880. Today, it is the only incorporated town in the township.

Schools

As the population of Hollis Township developed, and families formed, the need for schools became apparent. John Tharp, the first white settler in Hollis Township (mentioned earlier), became a teacher at Hollis School. Hollis was one of five schools that has existed in the township. The five include:

  • Hollis School, District 40
  • Maple Ridge School, District 41
  • Mapleton School, District 42
  • Martin School, District 43
  • Wheeler School, District 44

Wheeler and Hollis Schools later merged to form the current Hollis Consolidated School District 328.

Martin School still exists as a residence at the corner of Tuscarora Rd and Cameron Lane.

Hollis School was torn down after the new facility was built. The original school site is now the location of the Tuscarora Fire Department, (corner of Tuscarora and Lafayette roads).

The original Wheeler School was located near the intersection of US Route 24 and Cameron Lane it burned in the 1980s. The second Wheeler School was located near Powell Road off Route 24 and became part of the Illini Bluffs School District.

The Mapleton School also became part of the Illinis Bluffs School District. Its most recent building was purchased in 2001 by the Hollis Park District and now houses recreational programs.

Some Peeks Into The Past

Some details from the earlier days of the township can give us a glimpse of those who preceded us:

  • Moses Perdue had the first vineyard in the area (1832) and the first cook stove (1848)
  • The LaMarsh Baptist Church traces its history to Oct. 27, 1838 when it was organized. The first meetings were held in homes before a house of worship was constructed in 1849 at a cost of $1,000.
  • Moses Dusenbury was the first to have a hand grist mill. He died when he fell off a cliff on the west branch of the LaMarsh Creek while riding his blind horse.
  • At a town meeting in 1856, a resolution to prohibit the running at large of swine and sheep failed to pass - too expensive to build fencing.
  • In 1863, a new post office at Harkers Corners was established.
  • In the 1830s, land was selling for $3 an acre.
  • In 1935, a teacher in Maple Ridge School signed a contract for $65/month for an 8-month school year. (Dismissal by May 1 was common among rural schools, allowing the students to help with summer farm work.)

Hollis Township today is a reflection of this intriguing past from shaft coal mines to farming to raising and educating children. And finally, to laying to rest those who gave us roads and names and a history.

Thanks to Larry Stranz and his family for providing much of the historical material for this brief history of Hollis Township.


Fire Department History

Originally, Hollis had a bucket brigade. A bucket brigade consisted of men who would respond to a fire. They would line up and pass buckets of water to each other, hand to hand, down the line towards the fire and continue until the fire was out.

In the early 1800's, Hollis purchased a pump (hand engine). The bucket brigade became the engine men. This pump was a "Fire King". The engine men pulled the "Fire King" with hand ropes to the fire. There they could manually pump a stream of water about 75 feet. However, there was no suction line on this pump, so a bucket brigade had to bring the water to the pump! The hose used was a 2" diameter leather hose. When it was discarded, an amateur cobbler used the hose to make rugged full soles and half-soles.

1858 was the year that the "Always Ready" was purchased. This engine had a suction pump and could be drawn by two horses or hand ropes. It could throw a stream of water about 100 feet. It too, used a leather hose. The leather hose was replaced by cotton jacketed rubber hose in 1871.

1859 a fire engine house was built by the town and furnished by the fire company. It was kept for the exclusive use of the engine men until 1862. They broke down their reserve and allowed the Soldiers Aid Society to meet in it.

In 1860, after purchasing a second engine, the department became "Company 1" to distinguish themselves from the schoolboys who were trained in the use of the hand tub.

The first hose carriage was put in service in 1873. It continued to serve until the late 1920's along with the "Always Ready".

In the early 1900's, a hand drawn soda-acid chemical outfit was used. It was said to be very heavy.

The first motorized apparatus was purchased in 1927. It was a GMC chassis with a 350 g.p.m. pump. It also carried ladders, hose and miscellaneous equipment. This pump continued until 1963. Next came a Model A Ford, which carried the chemical outfit for some time. It was later fitted with a front-end pump and remodeled to carry ladders, hose, etc.

A new fire station was dedicated in 1950. Centrally located, this station had three bays and was connected to the Town Hall by a meeting room. This served the Town of Hollis for many years. The department slowly outgrew it quarters and trucks that didn't fit were housed in the old town shed on Ash St.

In 1965 there were 5 fire fighting vehicles: a '42 Dodge, a '56 Ford, '63 Ford, an Army surplus Dodge, and an International truck.

Communication is very important in fire fighting. In the beginning, there was a fire horn that rang the alarm to alert everyone of a fire. With the telephone there came operator, who could contact just about the whole department in 1 minute. Then calls to a communication center allowed a dispatcher to utilize "quick call". Fire pagers, devices worn on the belt, would beep as an alarm to the fire fighter. A dispatcher would then send a message of location and type of fire and the fire fighter would know to respond.


DEPARTMENT OF ART HISTORY

Hollis Clayson is a historian of modern art who specializes in 19th-century Europe, especially France, and transatlantic exchanges between France and the U.S. Her first book, Painted Love: Prostitution in French Art of the Impressionist Era, appeared in 1991 (Yale U. Press reprinted by the Getty, 2003 and Getty Virtual Library, 2014). A co-edited thematic study of painting in the Western tradition, Understanding Paintings: Themes in Art Explored and Explained, came out in 2000, and has been translated into six other languages (Watson-Guptill Publications). Paris in Despair: Art and Everyday Life Under Siege (1870-71) was published in 2002 (U. of Chicago Press, paperback 2005). In 2013, she curated the exhibition ELECTRIC PARIS at the Clark Art Institute in Williamstown, MA. An expanded version of the exhibition was at the Bruce Museum of Art in Greenwich, CT during the spring and summer of 2016. Her co-edited book (with André Dombrowski), Is Paris Still the Capital of the Nineteenth Century? Essays on Art and Modernity, 1850-1900, appeared in 2016 (Routledge). Her new book, Illuminated Paris: Essays on Art and Lighting in the Belle Époque (U. of Chicago Press), appeared in 2019. Her current project is The Inescapability of the Eiffel Tower.

Her research has been supported by the American Council of Learned Societies, The Kaplan Center for the Humanities, the Getty Research Institute, the Clark Art Institute, the INHA in Paris, The Huntington Library, Columbia University Reid Hall in Paris, and CASVA. Her teaching has also been recognized. She won a WCAS Teaching Award (1987) as an Assistant Professor, was the first and only recipient of the College Art Association's Distinguished Teaching of Art History Award to a Junior Professor (1990), held a Charles Deering McCormick Professorship of Teaching Excellence (1993-96), was the Martin J. and Patricia Koldyke Outstanding Teaching Professor (2004-06), and received the Ver Steeg Award for Excellence in Graduate Student Advising (2016).

She was Robert Sterling Clark Visiting Professor in the Williams College Graduate Program in the History of Art in the fall of 2005. She was named Bergen Evans Professor in the Humanities at Northwestern in 2006, and served as the (founding) Director of the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities from 2006 to 2013. In 2013-14, she was the Samuel H. Kress Professor in the Center for the Advanced Study of the Visual Arts (CASVA) at the National Gallery of Art. In early 2014, she was named a Chevalier in the Ordre des Palmes Académiques by the French Ministry of Culture. In fall of 2015, she was Kirk Varnedoe Visiting Professor at the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University. In 2017-18, she was Paul Mellon Visiting Senior Fellow at CASVA and chercheuse invitée at the INHA (Paris).

Program Area: 18th and 19th Century, Global Modern and Contemporary

Regional Specialization: Europe

Regional Interests: The Social History of 19th-Century Art in the Era of the Material Turn Visual Representation and Lighting Technologies The Visual Culture of the Interior and the Threshold


DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY

S. Hollis Clayson (Ph.D., 1984, UCLA),  Professor Emerita of Art History and Bergen Evans Professor Emerita in the Humanities, is a historian of modern art who specializes in 19th-century Europe, especially France, and transatlantic exchanges between France and the U.S. Her first book, Painted Love: Prostitution in French Art of the Impressionist Era, appeared in 1991 (Yale U. Press reprinted by the Getty, 2003 and Getty Virtual Library, 2014). A co-edited thematic study of painting in the Western tradition, Understanding Paintings: Themes in Art Explored and Explained, came out in 2000, and has been translated into six other languages (Watson-Guptill Publications). Paris in Despair: Art and Everyday Life Under Siege (1870-71) was published in 2002 (U. of Chicago Press, paperback 2005). In 2013, she curated the exhibition ELECTRIC PARIS at the Clark Art Institute in Williamstown, MA. An expanded version of the exhibition was at the Bruce Museum of Art in Greenwich, CT during the spring and summer of 2016. Her co-edited book (with André Dombrowski), Is Paris Still the Capital of the Nineteenth Century? Essays on Art and Modernity, 1850-1900, appeared in 2016 (Routledge). Her new book, Illuminated Paris: Essays on Art and Lighting in the Belle Époque (U. of Chicago Press), will appear in spring 2019. Her current project is The Inescapability of the Eiffel Tower.

Her research has been supported by the American Council of Learned Societies, The Kaplan Center for the Humanities, the Getty Research Institute, the Clark Art Institute, the INHA in Paris, The Huntington Library, Columbia University Reid Hall in Paris, and CASVA. Her teaching has also been recognized. She won a WCAS Teaching Award (1987) as an Assistant Professor, was the first and only recipient of the College Art Association's Distinguished Teaching of Art History Award to a Junior Professor (1990), held a Charles Deering McCormick Professorship of Teaching Excellence (1993-96), was the Martin J. and Patricia Koldyke Outstanding Teaching Professor (2004-06), and received the Ver Steeg Award for Excellence in Graduate Student Advising (2016).

She was Robert Sterling Clark Visiting Professor in the Williams College Graduate Program in the History of Art in the fall of 2005. She was named Bergen Evans Professor in the Humanities at Northwestern in 2006, and served as the (founding) Director of the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities from 2006 to 2013. In 2013-14, she was the Samuel H. Kress Professor in the Center for the Advanced Study of the Visual Arts (CASVA) at the National Gallery of Art. In early 2014, she was named a Chevalier in the Ordre des Palmes Académiques by the French Ministry of Culture. In fall of 2015, she was Kirk Varnedoe Visiting Professor at the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University. In 2017-18, she was Paul Mellon Visiting Senior Fellow at CASVA and chercheuse invitée at the INHA (Paris).


Watch the video: Hollis DX300 Drysuit