Stickell DD-888 - History

Stickell DD-888 - History

Stickell DD-888

Stickell(DD-888: dp. 2,425; 1. 390'6; b. 40'10; dr. 18'6; s. 34.6 k. (tl.); cpl. 345; a. 6 5, 10 40mm., 10 21 tt.;cl. Gearing)Stickell (DD-888) was laid down on 5 January 1945 at Orange, Tex., by the Consolidated Shipbuilding Corp.; launched on 16 June 1945, sponsored by Miss Sue Stickell; and commissioned on 31 October 1945, Comdr. Francis E. Fleck in command.Assigned to the Atlantic Fleet, Stickell operated under Commander, Amphibious Training, Galveston, for a month, 10 December 1945 to 11 January 1946. She then conducted shakedown training out of Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, before arriving in Charleston, S.C., on 11 March for post-shakedown availability. She shifted to Norfolk, Va., on 21 April and, until 6 May, supported carrier qualifications from that port with Kearsarge (CV-33). She then screened Kearsarge to Guantanamo Bay and, from there, to the Panama Canal. She returned to Norfolk on 13 June. Two days later, she got underway for the west coast. Heading via the Panama Canal, she reached San Diego, Calif., on 29 June and joined Destroyer Division (DesDiv) 11. Over the next four and one-half years, Stickell made three cruises to the Far East to serve with the 7th Fleet. During these deployments, she visited the Philippines, the Marianas, Japan' China, and Okinawa. After each tour of duty in the western Pacific, she returned to duty along the west coast and in Hawaiian waters. Drills and exercises occupied the bulk of her time during the postwar period.On 6 November 1950, Stickell completed overhaul at Mare Island Naval Shipyard and sailed for the Korean War Zone with DesDiv 52. She made Sasebo, Japan, on the 27th and, three days later, joined the screen of Task Force (TF) 77. The destroyer's first Korean War tour lasted until 20 July 1951. During that deployment, she operated with the fast carriers off the southern and eastern coasts of Korea, participated in antisubmarine warfare exercises off Yokosuka, Japan, conducted shore bombardments of the Songjin-Wonsan area and patrolled the waters off Shingjin, Yong-do and Chongjin for enemy small craft. In addition, she landed Republic of Korea intelligence teams on hostile shores: and she rescued three air crewmen while on lifeguard duty for the carriers. On 20 July 1951, she headed east toward the United States and arrived in San Diego, Calif., on 4 August.For almost seven months, Stickell remained on the west coast, conducting training operations out of San Diego. On 26 January 1952, she put to sea for the Far East once again. After stopping at Yokosuka from 19 to 23 February, she began her second combat tour in Korean waters. Between 23 February and 19 March, she operated with TF 77 off the coast of Korea and made three shore bombardments, one off Yong-do on 28 February with Rochester (CA-132), one at the bombline on 5 March; and one off Singchong-Ni on 11 March with Saint Paul (CA-73). On the 19th, Stickell and the rest of DesDiv 52 joined the United Nations blockading and escort force, Task Group (TG) 95.2. As the bombardment and patrol element, Stickell not only blockaded Hungnam, but also delivered interdiction and shore bombardment fire.After bombarding Wonsan Harbor on 31 March, she rejoined TF 77 on 1 April and retired with that force to Yokosuka. She remained at Yokosuka during the first two weeks in April, then resumed support for TF 77 air strikes and intermittent shore bombardments. She was in Yokosuka from 29 May to 18 June for drydocking and repairs before conducting a brief operation along Korea's east coast, including a night landing in the vicinity of Pohang Dong. Stickell cleared the area on 23 June with DesDiv 52 for exercises out of Buckner Bay, Okinawa. The division returned to Yokosuka on 5 July and, on the 6th, was underway again to visit Hong Kong and to patrol the Taiwan Strait. She rendezvoused with Carrier Division 3 on the 14th and, with TG 50.3, conducted operations in the Philippines and in the South China Sea, before returning to the Taiwan area to rejoin TF 77 on the 27th. After further operations off the eastern coast of Korea, she entered Yokosuka on 6 August and, four days later, sailed for return to the United States.Stickell arrived in San Diego on 26 August and remained there until 13 December, when she was decommissioned at Long Beach to begin conversion to a radar picket destroyer (DDR). On 2 September 1953 Stickell (DDR-888) was recommissioned at Long Beach, Comdr. James Boyd in command. Following training out of Long Beach, she joined DesDiv 21 at San Diego on 18 January 1954. Two days later, she and her division headed for the western Pacific. This deployment consisted primarily of hunter-killer training and Taiwan Strait patrol. On 1 June, she departed Sasebo on a voyage to complete a circumnavigation of the globe. Along the way, she visited Hong Kong, Singapore, Ceylon, Kenya, South Africa, Brazil, and Trinidad. She reached Norfolk, Va., on 10 August 1954 and joined DesDiv 262 of the Atlantic Fleet.For the next nine years, Stickell served the Atlantic Fleet as a radar destroyer. Between 1954 and 1958, she went through two complete training cycles, including yard overhauls, Mediterranean deployments refresher training, and NATO and Atlantic Fleet exercises. She received the latest in electronic equipment during her 1958 overhaul; and, soon thereafter, she was outfitted with an experimental data processing and weapons analysis system. In 1961, she earned the Atlantic Fleet Destroyer force Antiair Warfare Trophy. Her seven-month Mediterranean cruise in 1962 was highlighted by an excursion into the Black Sea. In the fall of 1962, Stickell participated in the Cuban Quarantine and showed great efficiency by departing Norfolk on very short notice to assume her station.In May 1963, she entered the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard for a Fleet Rehabilitation and Modernization (FRAM) overhaul. Stickell surrendered her antiaircraft warfare electronics equipment in return for the latest in ASW gear, including ASROC missiles and DASH helicopters. Early in 1964, she rejoined the Atlantic Fleet in Destroyer Squadron (DesRon) 12 as a straight DD. Home ported at Newport, R.I., she became the flagship of DesDiv 122. Following refresher training in April, she became a unit of the midshipman training squadron and made a cruise to northern European ports in June and July. From August to November, she served with the Atlantic Antisubmarine Warfare Forces; then she deployed to the Mediterranean until March 1965.She returned to Newport and, in April, shifted to Norfolk to complete her DASH outfitting. In June, Stickell joined TF 124, in supporting United States and other OAS forces operating in the Dominican Republic during the 1965 upheavals in that country. After five weeks of patrolling, she entered the Bethlehem Steel Corp. shipyard at Boston, Mass., for a six week overhaul. In October, she took station off the west coast of Africa to participate in the recovery of Gemini 6. However, the mission was scrubbed, and Stickell returned, via Martinique, to Newport. In November and early December, she participated in amphibious exercises at Vieques Island, near Puerto Rico; then returned to Newport.On 19 January 1966, Stickell, along with the other units of Destroyer Squadron 12, departed Newport for duty with the 7th Fleet in the Far East. After transiting the Panama Canal and brief stops at San Diego and Pearl Harbor, the ship commenced wartime operations in the South China Sea in support of the Republic of South Vietnam. While attached to the 7th Fleet, Stickell was assigned to Search and Rescue (SAR) and helicopter inflight refueling duties in the Tonkin Gulf; plane guarding for various attack carriers, especially Ranger ( CVA-61), and gunfire support duties. During the deployment, the ship visited the following Far East ports: Kaohsiung, Formosa; Yokosuka, Japan; Subic Bay, Philippines; Hong Kong; and Naha, Okinawa. En route back to Newport-completely circumnavigating the world-Stickell visited Port Dickson, Malaya; Cochin, India; and Aden. She transited the Suez and touched at Athens, Greece Palma, Mallorca, and Gibraltar. The ship returned to Newport on 17 August 1966.In October 1966, Stickell entered the Boston Naval Shipyard for overhaul. She emerged in February 1967 and headed toward Guantanamo Bay for refresher training. Stickell then headed for Culebra Island where she qualified as a naval gunfire support ship. After a short inport period, Stickell deployed on a four month ASW cruise. During the northern European segment of the cruise, Stickell visited Bergen Norway; Aarjus, Denmark; Sundsvall, Sweden; and Thurso, Scotland. She operated with ships and aircraft from the navies of Norway, Denmark, West Germany Great Britain, and France. Stickell then entered the Mediterranean Sea and joined the 6th Fleet. She operated with Essex (CVS-9) and several other destroyers as a "pouncer" ASW Task Force. While in the Mediterranean, Stickell visited Naples, Italy; Valletta, Malta, and Palermo, Sicily. On 19 September 1967, she steamed past Brenton Reef Light and was home again.Before the end of the year, Stickell participated in two ASW exercises. The first, "Canus Silex," a combined Canadian-United States ASW exercise and the second, "Fixwex India." By February 1968, Stickell was preparing for a visit to the Caribbean and her part in "Springboard 68." After leaving frozen Newport behind, Stickell participated in a variety of training operations designed to sharpen her crew's already finely honed efficiency. Following Springboard, she acted as sonar training ship at the Fleet Antisubmarine Warfare School at Key West, Florida.The next several months were spent preparing for Stickell's next deployment. On 2 July 1968, Stickell left Newport for a six-month, 13-nation cruise of the Indian Ocean as part of the Navy's Middle East Force. She visited San Juan, Puerto Rico; Recife, Brazil; Luanda, Angola; Lorenco Marques, Mozambique; Port Louis, Mauritius, Cochin, India, Karachi, Pakistan; Bahrain; Massawa, Ethiopia; Mombasa, Kenya; Assah, Ethiopia; Bandar Abbas, Iran; Bushire, Iran; Kuwait; and Dakar, Senegal-touching some ports more than once. While in the Persian Gulf area, Stickell participated in the international naval exercise "Middlinx XI." Together with units of the United States, British, and Iranian navies, Stickell once again demonstrated her readiness in the fields of antisubmarine and antiaircraft warfare. Stickell returned home on 10 January 1969.Over the next three years, Stickell alternated deployments with operations off the east coast of the United States and in the Caribbean Sea. She was deployed to the Mediterranean again from September 1969 until late March 1970, when she returned to Norfolk. After post-deployment leave and upkeep, sheheaded to Davisville, R.I., on 18 May for a month of hull repairs. Back in Norfolk again on 20 June, she remained there, except for two brief operations with John F. Kennedy (CVA-67) in July, until 9 November when she got underway to off-load ammunition at Yorktown, in preparation for drydocking at Newport News, Va., from 13 November until 7 December. For the remainder of the year, she prepared for deployment to the Indian Ocean. Her second deployment with the Middle Eastern Force began on 7 January 1971, when she put to sea from Norfolk and ended on 29 June, upon her return to Norfolk. In the meantime she visited ports in Brazil, Angola, Mozambique, Madagascar, Mauritius, Bahrein, Saudi Arabia, Ethiopia, Iran, India, Pakistan, Kenya, and Senegal.At the end of this, her last, deployment, Stickell remained in the Virginia Capes area-for the most part at anchor or in port. She spent most of the remainder of 1971 and the first half of 1972 preparing for decommissioning and transfer to the government of Greece. On 1 July 1972, Stickell was decommissioned and struck from the Navy list. Immediately thereafter, the Greek Navy took possession of her and recommissioned her as Kanaquis (D-212).Stickell (DD-888) earned six battle stars for Korean War service and one for service in the Vietnam War.


The table below contains the names of sailors who served aboard the USS Stickell (DD 888). Please keep in mind that this list does only include records of people who submitted their information for publication on this website. If you also served aboard and you remember one of the people below you can click on the name to send an email to the respective sailor. Would you like to have such a crew list on your website?

Looking for US Navy memorabilia? Try the Ship's Store.

There are 82 crew members registered for the USS Stickell (DD 888).

Select the period (starting by the reporting year): precomm &ndash 1965 | 1966 &ndash now

NameRank/RatePeriodDivisionRemarks/Photo
Stanick, FrankSF2Jan 13, 1966 &ndash Feb 26, 1968Hull
Doolin, Richarde3Aug 1966 &ndash Jun 1968deck paint lockerIn charge of paint locker from 1966 to 1968, Stood asroc watches, stationed in rear gun mount during general quarters.
Emore, HarryMM3Aug 6, 1966 &ndash Jul 7, 1970
Westmoreland, Glen L.GMGSNFeb 1967 &ndash Apr 1968Fox
Watkins, Dave BT 3Feb 3, 1967 &ndash May 31, 1968Aft FireroomWas with some of you when we went to the North Atlantic and Med. Remember doing a lot of firesides in the North Atlantic because of the CRUDE oil we took on. Would like to hear from you.
Taliaferro, Barrymr2Sep 1967 &ndash Jun 1971r
Crowley, RobertST3Sep 19, 1967 &ndash Apr 19, 1969weaponsI remember the North Atlantic good will cruise the Stickell made to Norway,Sweden,Denmark, Scotland and the Med. I played in the ships rock and roll band and it was the kind of cruise that most sailors dream of.
Lane, Marke-4Nov 1967 &ndash Jan 10, 1969m
Burke, ChuckSK2Nov 10, 1967 &ndash Jan 1970supply
Clouse, Robert 1968 &ndash 1972SnipeWas in the forward fireroom. Was on the Stickell the whole time I was in.
Turner, MikeEm31968 &ndash 1970Electrical
Armour, JohnBM1968 &ndash 1970Deck
Busse, RobertEN31968 &ndash 1970engineeringServed as engineman,also assigned to flight deck for the DASH program.
Flandreau, MarkENS, LTjg1968 &ndash 1969EngineeringMemorable Indian Ocean deployment. Natives very aggressive about selling drugs. Visited ports US ships are not allowed in any more. Stayed active duty through two more ships, then stayed in Reserves - made O6 (ret).
Reese, DonBT2Jan 10, 1968 &ndash Jan 4, 1971B Division After I left the Navy I went back to sea USMM I work a Captain out of NY on Ocean Going Tugs
Merrill, DonaldBT3Apr 1968 &ndash May 1969BWorked aft fireroom
Sacco, GarymmfnApr 1968 &ndash Jun 1970Engduring my tour with the Stickle I met a lot of great people. Worked in Main Control and aft Eng. room. I actually am still in touch with one of my shipmates. Mr Bill Heller.
Waters, Charlie ETR3Apr 2, 1968 &ndash Apr 23, 1968WeaponsTemp. Assignment to replace a DASH Tech on Emerg. LV
Matt, GibsonSEAMANJun 15, 1968 &ndash Jun 15, 1969 hi fellows I was aboard the 888 in the late 60's that is 68-69 if any of you fellows remember e-mail me .
Verrill, Randall sn1969 &ndash Aug 1970weaponson board 2 weeks then we left for med
Sikes, S. LeeEns / LtjgSep 1, 1969 &ndash Dec 1, 1970R DivMed Cruise. High point was plugging the rusted hole in the hull under #2 boiler while underway. Low point was losing overboard Sn Amoroso while returning home.
Shugart, JimLTJGOct 1969 &ndash Jan 1972Gunnery, PersonnelBeen sailing since 1982 and was in USPS and CGA from 1986-2015. Loved going to sea and the rougher the weather, the more I liked it like typhoon in Indian Ocean.
Morgan, JimHT3Oct 21, 1969 &ndash Jul 24, 1972repairA lot of good memories on board Stickell..hard work..great crew..Med Cruise and Middle east cruise..
Jolley, KennethE3Dec 27, 1969 &ndash May 22, 1970USN
Jolley, KennethMMDec 30, 1969 &ndash May 22, 1970Aft engineroomSeeking anyone who remembers the name of the Tanker which refueled the USS Stickell and the USS Semmes between 20 March, 1970 & 28 March, 1970 on their trip from the Med back to Norfolk. Please reply to [email protected]
Fletcher, ThomasBT-31970 &ndash 1972 Served on active duty from Nov 1968 to Nov 1978 as a BT2. Joined US Navy Reserves in Dec 1978. Retired as a BTC in Dec 1994. Currently live in Cockeysville MD and work as an Operating Engineer at GBMC in Baltimore MD
Lemon, TerrySTG31970 &ndash May 1972ASWMideast cruise was the high point
Whitener, MannyRM3May 1970 &ndash Jul 1, 1972OPSI was also there on day Stickell was decommissioned. I also was released from active duty that day. I Would like to say hi to Jerry Demeyer.
Whitener, MannyRM3May 5, 1970 &ndash Jul 1, 1972OPSServed on USS Stickell for 2 1/2 years. Was Discharged the day of Decommissioning 7/1/72.
Herman, DennisfnAug 1970 &ndash Jun 3, 1972electricalWent on the Indian Ocean cruise 1/71-7/71 was night messcook, then went over to the ic gang working with em2 Hoover.
Ramse, BenBT3Sep 28, 1970 &ndash Jul 1, 1972BT Oil ShackThe oil shack always kept a good supply of coffee and glazed donuts. The head cook needed boiler compound to clean equipment, and we needed the glazed donuts - a GOOD trade-off!
Rice, SteveYN3Nov 2, 1970 &ndash Jun 1972ExecutiveServed as Captain's writer and ship's yeoman.
Klunk, MichaelSA, SN, YNSN, YN3Dec 6, 1970 &ndash Jul 1, 1972Deck, Supply, Weps, AdminFirst ship. Decom crew/ 6 months deck force 6 months mess cooking YN "A" school last year Weps YN and Ship's Office.
Noe, VasquezseamenDec 14, 1970 &ndash Jul 1, 1972deck divisioni would like to say to last deck division crew and the last cruise we made to the middle east. i was discharge the day the ship was dcommmissioning 7/01/1972.
Demeyer, JerryRM21971 &ndash 1972OPSI was promoted to E5 and also held final colors on the USS Stickell on her final day as a U. S. Navy ship.
Pratt, DaveBME41971 &ndashBoatsLooking for James Passmore
Anderson, DanTM31971 &ndash 1972sonarPart of the decommissioning crew. Remember the cruise down the inland waterway? How many times did we lose power?
Davern, TimothyRM3Jan 5, 1971 &ndash 1972OperationsI remember standing "Mail Buoy Watch" from the signal bridge, full GQ gear, and being charged with "failure to obey an order" at King Neptune's Court.
Ott, KeithCommanderJan 10, 1971 &ndash Jul 1, 1972CommandI was the last CO on transfer of Stickell to the Hellenic Navy. Good ship and better crew
Dukes, StevenETR3May 20, 1971 &ndash Jan 26, 1972Operations (Electronics)Would enjoy contact with anyone else who was aboard the same time I was. I worked on the AN/SPS-29 and other shipboard radar equipment. After leaving the Stickell I reported aboard the FDR-CVA42 carrier in Mayport, FL.
Hawkins, DonaldBTFNJul 1971 &ndash Apr 1972 only served aboard for a short time as a BTFN then transfered to the USS Biddle. while on board worked in the after fireroom.
Hart, BillCS3Oct 12, 1971 &ndash Jul 1972SupplyI ws part of the last crew aboard the Stickell before it ws sold to Greece.Just one of a few guys from Philadelphia area on there at the time

Select the period (starting by the reporting year): precomm &ndash 1965 | 1966 &ndash now


Stickell DD-888 - History

(DD-888: dp. 2,425 l. 390'6" b. 40'10" dr. 18'6" s. 34.6 k. (tl.) cpl. 345 a. 6 5", 10 40mm., 10 21" tt.cl. Gearing)

Stickell (DD-888) was laid down on 5 January 1945 at Orange, Tex., by the Consolidated Shipbuilding Corp. launched on 16 June 1945, sponsored by Miss Sue Stickell and commissioned on 31 October 1945, Comdr. Francis E. Fleck in command.

for a month, 10 December 1945 to 11 January 1946. She then conducted shakedown training out of Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, before arriving in Charleston, S.C., on 11 March for post-shakedown availability. She shifted to Norfolk, Va., on 21 April and, until 6 May, supported carrier qualifications from that port with Kearsarge (CV-33). She then screened Kearsarge to Guantanamo Bay and, from there, to the Panama Canal. She returned to Norfolk on 13 June. Two days later, she got underway for the west coast. Heading via the Panama Canal, she reached San Diego, Calif., on 29 June and joined Destroyer Division (DesDiv) 11. Over the next four and one-half years, Stickell made three cruises to the Far East to serve with the 7th Fleet. During these deployments, she visited the Philippines, the Marianas, Japan, China, and Okinawa. After each tour of duty in the western Pacific, she returned to duty along the west coast and in Hawaiian waters. Drills and exercises occupied the bulk of her time during the postwar period.

On 6 November 1950, Stickell completed overhaul at Mare Island Naval Shipyard and sailed for the Korean War Zone with DesDiv 52. She made Sasebo, Japan, on the 27th and, three days later, joined the screen of Task Force (TF) 77. The destroyer's first Korean War tour lasted until 20 July 1951. During that deployment, she operated with the fast carriers off the southern and eastern coasts of Korea, participated in antisubmarine warfare exercises off Yokosuka, Japan, conducted shore bombardments of the Songjin-Wonsan area and patrolled the waters off Shingjin, Yong-do and Chongjin for enemy small craft. In addition, she landed Republic of Korea intelligence teams on hostile shores: and she rescued three air crewmen while on lifeguard duty for the carriers. On 20 July 1951, she headed east toward the United States and arrived in San Diego, Calif., on 4 August.

For almost seven months, Stickell remained on the west coast, conducting training operations out of San Diego. On 26 January 1952, she put to sea for the Far East once again. After stopping at Yokosuka from 19 to 23 February, she began her second combat tour in Korean waters. Between 23 February and 19 March, she operated with TF 77 off the coast of Korea and made three shore bombardments, one off Yong-do on 28 February with Rochester (CA-124), one at the bombline on 5 March and one off Singchong-Ni on 11 March with Saint Paul (CA-73). On the 19th, Stickell and the rest of DesDiv 52 joined the United Nations blockading and escort force, Task Group (TG) 95.2. As the bombardment and patrol element, Stickell not only blockaded Hungnam, but also delivered interdiction and shore bombardment fire.

After bombarding Wonsan Harbor on 31 March, she rejoined TF 77 on 1 April and retired with that force to Yokosuka. She remained at Yokosuka during the first two weeks in April, then resumed support for TF 77 air strikes and intermittent shore bombardments. She was in Yokosuka from 29 May to 18 June for drydocking and repairs before conducting a brief operation along Korea's east coast, including a night landing in the vicinity of Pohang Dong. Stickell cleared the area on 23 June with DesDiv 52 for exercises out of Buckner Bay, Okinawa. The division returned to Yokosuka on 5 July and, on the 6th, was underway again to visit Hong Kong and to patrol the Taiwan Strait. She rendezvoused with Carrier Division 3 on the 14th and, with TG 50.3, conducted operations in the Philippines and in the South China Sea, before returning to the Taiwan area to rejoin TF 77 on the 27th. After further operations off the eastern coast of Korea, she entered Yokosuka on 6 August and, four days later, sailed for return to the United States.

Stickell arrived in San Diego on 26 August and remained there until 13 December, when she was decommissioned at Long Beach to begin conversion to a radar picket destroyer (DDR). On 2 September 1953 Stickell (DDR-888) was recommissioned at Long Beach, Comdr. James Boyd in command. Following training out of Long Beach, she joined DesDiv 21 at San Diego on 18 January 1954. Two days later, she and her division headed for the western Pacific. This deployment consisted primarily of hunter-killer training and Taiwan Strait patrol. On 1 June, she departed Sasebo on a voyage to complete a circumnavigation of the globe. Along the way, she visited Hong Kong, Singapore, Ceylon, Kenya, South Africa, Brazil, and Trinidad. She reached Norfolk, Va., on 10 August 1954 and joined DesDiv 262 of the Atlantic Fleet.

For the next nine years, Stickell served the Atlantic Fleet as a radar destroyer. Between 1954 and 1958, she went through two complete training cycles, including yard overhauls, Mediterranean deployments refresher training, and NATO and Atlantic Fleet exercises. She received the latest in electronic equipment during her 1958 overhaul and, soon thereafter, she was outfitted with an experimental data processing and weapons analysis system. In 1961, she earned the Atlantic Fleet Destroyer force Antiair Warfare Trophy. Her seven-month Mediterranean cruise in 1962 was highlighted by an excursion into the Black Sea. In the fall of 1962, Stickell participated in the Cuban Quarantine and showed great efficiency by departing Norfolk on very short notice to assume her station.

In May 1963, she entered the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard for a Fleet Rehabilitation and Modernization (FRAM) overhaul. Stickell surrendered her antiaircraft warfare electronics equipment in return for the latest in ASW gear, including ASROC missiles and DASH helicopters. Early in 1964, she rejoined the Atlantic Fleet in Destroyer Squadron (DesRon) 12 as a straight DD. Home ported at Newport, R.I., she became the flagship of DesDiv 122. Following refresher training in April, she became a unit of the midshipman training squadron and made a cruise to northern European ports in June and July. From August to November, she served with the Atlantic Antisubmarine Warfare Forces then she deployed to the Mediterranean until March 1965.

She returned to Newport and, in April, shifted to Norfolk to complete her DASH outfitting. In June, Stickell joined TF 124, in supporting United States and other OAS forces operating in the Dominican Republic during the 1965 upheavals in that country. After five weeks of patrolling, she entered the Bethlehem Steel Corp. shipyard at Boston, Mass., for a six week overhaul. In October, she took station off the west coast of Africa to participate in the recovery of Gemini 6. However, the mission was scrubbed, and Stickell returned, via Martinique, to Newport. In November and early December, she participated in amphibious exercises at Vieques Island, near Puerto Rico then returned to Newport.

On 19 January 1966, Stickell, along with the other units of Destroyer Squadron 12, departed Newport for duty with the 7th Fleet in the Far East. After transiting the Panama Canal and brief stops at San Diego and Pearl Harbor, the ship commenced wartime operations in the South China Sea in support of the Republic of South Vietnam. While attached to the 7th Fleet, Stickell was assigned to Search and Rescue (SAR) and helicopter inflight refueling duties in the Tonkin Gulf plane guarding for various attack carriers, especially Ranger ( CVA-61), and gunfire support duties. During the deployment, the ship visited the following Far East ports: Kaohsinng, Formosa Yokosuka, Japan Subic Bay, Philippines Hong Kong and Naha, Okinawa. En route back to Newport completely circumnavigating the world Stickell visited Port Dickson, Malaya Cochin, India and Aden. She transited the Suez and touched at Athens, Greece Palma, Mallorca, and Gibraltar. The ship returned to Newport on 17 August 1966.

1967 and headed toward Guantanamo Bay for refresher training. Stickell then headed for Culebra Island where she qualified as a naval gunfire support ship. After a short inport period, Stickell deployed on a four month ASW cruise. During the northern European segment of the cruise, Stickell visited Bergen Norway Aarjus, Denmark Sundsvall, Sweden and Thurso, Scotland. She operated with ships and aircraft from the navies of Norway, Denmark, West Germany Great Britain, and France. Stickell then entered the Mediterranean Sea and joined the 6th Fleet. She operated with Essex (CVS-9) and several other destroyers as a "pouncer" ASW Task Force. While in the Mediterranean, Stickell visited Naples, Italy Valletta, Malta, and Palermo, Sicily. On 19 September 1967, she steamed past Brenton Reef Light and was home again.

Before the end of the year, Stickell participated in two ASW exercises. The first, "Canus Silex," a combined Canadian-United States ASW exercise and the second, "Fixwex India." By February 1968, Stickell was preparing for a visit to the Caribbean and her part in "Springboard 68." After leaving frozen Newport behind, Stickell participated in a variety of training operations designed to sharpen her crew's already finely honed efficiency. Following Springboard, she acted as sonar training ship at the Fleet Antisubmarine Warfare School at Key West, Florida.

The next several months were spent preparing for Stickell's next deployment. On 2 July 1968, Stickell left Newport for a six-month, 13-nation cruise of the Indian Ocean as part of the Navy's Middle East Force. She visited San Juan, Puerto Rico Recife, Brazil Luanda, Angola Lorenco Marques, Mozambique Port Louis, Mauritius, Cochin, India, Karachi, Pakistan Bahrain Massawa, Ethiopia Mombasa, Kenya Assah, Ethiopia Bandar Abbas, Iran Bushire, Iran Kuwait and Dakar, Senegal touching some ports more than once. While in the Persian Gulf area, Stickell participated in the international naval exercise "Middlinx XI." Together with units of the United States, British, and Iranian navies, Stickell once again demonstrated her readiness in the fields of antisubmarine and antiaircraft warfare. Stickell returned home on 10 January 1969.

Over the next three years, Stickell alternated deployments with operations off the east coast of the United States and in the Caribbean Sea. She was deployed to the Mediterranean again from September 1969 until late March 1970, when she returned to Norfolk. After post-deployment leave and upkeep, she headed to Davisville, R.I., on 18 May for a month of hull repairs. Back in Norfolk again on 20 June, she remained there, except for two brief operations with John F. Kennedy (CVA-67) in July, until 9 November when she got underway to off-load ammunition at Yorktown, in preparation for drydocking at Newport News, Va., from 13 November until 7 December. For the remainder of the year, she prepared for deployment to the Indian Ocean. Her second deployment with the Middle Eastern Force began on 7 January 1971, when she put to sea from Norfolk and ended on 29 June, upon her return to Norfolk. In the meantime she visited ports in Brazil, Angola, Mozambique, Madagascar, Mauritius, Bahrein, Saudi Arabia, Ethiopia, Iran, India, Pakistan, Kenya, and Senegal.

At the end of this, her last, deployment, Stickell remained in the Virginia Capes area for the most part at anchor or in port. She spent most of the remainder of 1971 and the first half of 1972 preparing for decommissioning and transfer to the government of Greece. On 1 July 1972, Stickell was decommissioned and struck from the Navy list. Immediately thereafter, the Greek Navy took possession of her and recommissioned her as Kanaris (D-212).

Stickell (DD-888) earned six battle stars for Korean War service and one for service in the Vietnam War.


Description

We are happy to offer a classic style 5 panel custom US Navy destroyer DD 888 USS Stickell embroidered hat.

For an additional (and optional) charge of $7.00, our hats can be personalized with up to 2 lines of text of 14 characters each (including spaces), such as with a veteran’s last name and rate and rank on the first line, and years of service on the second line.

Our DD 888 USS Stickell embroidered hat comes in two styles for your choosing. A traditional “high profile” flat bill snap back style (with an authentic green under visor on the bottom of the flat bill), or a modern “medium profile” curved bill velcro back “baseball cap” style. Both styles are “one size fits all”. Our hats are made of durable 100% cotton for breathability and comfort.

Given high embroidery demands on these “made to order” hats, please allow 4 weeks for shipment.

If you have any questions about our hat offerings, please contact us at 904-425-1204 or e-mail us at [email protected] , and we will be happy to speak to you!


USS Stickell

When was the last time you checked to see as the VA has updated the list. Also you don’t have to prove you were in the brown water as you can now prove you were in the blue water with in 12 miles off the coast of Vietnam.

The Fire was in 1971, also google your ship and Google Navy ship logs.

Are you already service connected with any conditions?

What conditions are you wanting to try and get service connected now?

Agent Orange is not claimable, it’s the conditions caused from AO. Heart disease, Diabetes, peripheral neuropathy, Prostate Cancer, Skin Cancer, Parkinson’s Disease. If you have any of these then you can claim them with the right evidence.

Current diagnosis, copies of all medical records as best you can showing earliest diagnoses, and have your treating Dr. Make a short statement stating whatever conditions you have were caused by AO.

Example: veterans diabetes is as likely as not caused by his exposure to AO. You can also have the Dr. write it in your treatment notes.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Jan 12, 2020 #3 2020-01-13T01:30

Welcome. Please begin a new thread in which is a different topic.

Recommend you review a book titled “Vietnam: Naval and Riverine Weapons” by Philip Gutzman. It may use some official references to prove your case.

I’d be curious as to what your decision rating says in its denial.

Jan 12, 2020 #4 2020-01-13T02:30

"On August 22, 2019, the VA began scanning more than 20 million images from the U.S. Navy and Coast Guard deck logs so that they can be made available online. While the scanning project is underway, U.S. Navy and Coast Guard deck logs from 1956 to 1978 will be closed to researchers."

Nick
USAF RETIRED
100% P&T
100% CRSC

Complete layman - not a VSO and not a VA employee.

Jan 13, 2020 #5 2020-01-13T09:02

Jan 13, 2020 #6 2020-01-13T09:28

Jan 13, 2020 #7 2020-01-13T09:31

Jan 13, 2020 #8 2020-01-13T13:13

Jan 13, 2020 #9 2020-01-13T14:31

Jan 13, 2020 #10 2020-01-13T15:39

Here is a link to crewmen aboard the ship . Maybe you can meet up with another crewman there & possible get a buddy letter, etc., etc.
https://www.navysite.de/crewlist/comman . tyear=1945

Jan 13, 2020 #11 2020-01-13T21:04

Jan 13, 2020 #12 2020-01-13T21:25

Jan 13, 2020 #13 2020-01-13T21:34

Mar 06, 2020 #14 2020-03-07T01:42

Not to sound glib to any degree, but maintaining the storage of military records is not a responsibility of the VA. For your quest, you need only look toward the records held by the Navy Department (maybe) and the National Archives, which I'll explain in some detail.

There are a couple specific things to get the proof you are seeking to show your ship, with you aboard, were within the Territorial Waters of the former South Vietnam, which I’ll list below:

1. National Archives – USS Stickell (DD888) Deck Logs for June 26, 27 & 28, 1966, these were the only dates showing Stickell on NGFS . Email request for these documents to [email protected] . It will cost a few bucks but you'll need, in all probability, the position of the ship in conjunction with the CONGA data you’ll need (below) which could well place your ship within the 12 mile limit, and they are available.


On those dates, Stickell was part of Operation Jay, an amphibious landing by US Marines and 1 st ARVN forces. A DD can’t support an amphibious landing with only 5”x 38cal guns out 12+ n. Miles from the beach! Time lost getting to the beach setting up for a call for fire could very well mean more telegrams back home.


USS Stickell

USS Stickell DD - 888 was a Gearing - class destroyer of the United States Navy. She was named for Lieutenant John H. Stickell USNR 1914 1943 who was
John H. Stickell July 31, 1913 December 19, 1943 was a pilot in the Royal Canadian Air Force and an aviator in the United States Navy during World
destroyer Kanaris D212 a Gearing - class destroyer launched in 1945 as USS Stickell she was transferred to Greece in 1972 and renamed. She was scrapped in
destroyers USS Corry DDR - 817 USS C. P. Cecil DDR - 835 USS Stickell DDR - 888 and USS O Hare DDR - 889 On February 6, 1961 I went aboard USS Corry DDR - 817
January 1952, she stood out of San Diego in company with USS Arnold J. Isbell and USS Stickell bound for the Korean War once more. After stops at Pearl
the Panama Canal on 9 January and anchored briefly at San Diego where Stickell joined the group before continuing west. The destroyers called at Pearl
screening exercise followed. Finally, on 28 September, she was relieved by USS Stickell at Pollença Bay, Majorca. On the 30th, Barney headed back to the United
September, she assisted in extinguishing a fire in the after engine room of Stickell DD - 888 in November. Through the remainder of 1967 Richard E. Kraus operated
Newport, R.I. After assignments as a surface warfare officer on USS Pandemus and USS Stickell he volunteered for service in Vietnam as a lieutenant in command
DD - 86, DD - 479 USS Stevens Battery 1862 USS Stevenson DD - 503, DD - 645 USS Stewart DD - 13, DD - 224, DE - 238 USS Stickell DD - 888 DDR - 888 USS Stickleback

batteries and suffered no damage. Brinkley Bass and USS Stickell silenced a battery at Kalmagak on March 22. USS Wiltsie received fire from the batteries east
18 December 1941. Kanaris D212 a Gearing - class destroyer, formerly USS Stickell DD - 888 transferred from the U.S. Navy on 1 July 1972. Kanaris F464
1972 1993 The ex - USS Stickell named after admiral and multiple Prime Minister Constantine Kanaris. Kountouriotis D213 1973 1994 The ex - USS Rupertus, named
Richard E. Kraus DD - 849 Massey DD - 778 Fred T. Berry DD - 858 and Stickell DD - 888 - Fiske sailed south into the Caribbean, and through the Gulf
Lieutenant Stickell bled to death. As a result of his sacrifice and his earlier bravery during previous attacks on enemy installations Lieutenant Stickell was
and was anchored off the Yangtze estuary. On 10 January, in company with Stickell and HMS Black Swan, the destroyer shielded the merchant ship. Bausell then
to this squadron: USS Forrest Sherman, USS James E. Williams, USS Winston S. Churchill, USS Porter, USS Mahan, USS Mitscher, and USS Laboon. Destroyer
Tainan, Taiwan USS Joseph P. Kennedy Jr. in Fall River, Massachusetts ROKS Jeong Ju, ex - Rogers near Cheonan, South Korea and USS Orleck in Lake Charles
Kaneohe to Eniwetok in five increments of three aircraft each, arriving at Stickell Field on the 14th. VB - 102 relieved VB - 109 and assumed duties as part of
DD - 885 John R. Craig DD - 886 Orleck DD - 887 Brinkley Bass DD - 888 Stickell DD - 889 O Hare DD - 890 Meredith DD - 891 to DD - 926 cancelled Mitscher class

  • USS Stickell DD - 888 was a Gearing - class destroyer of the United States Navy. She was named for Lieutenant John H. Stickell USNR 1914 1943 who was
  • John H. Stickell July 31, 1913 December 19, 1943 was a pilot in the Royal Canadian Air Force and an aviator in the United States Navy during World
  • destroyer Kanaris D212 a Gearing - class destroyer launched in 1945 as USS Stickell she was transferred to Greece in 1972 and renamed. She was scrapped in
  • destroyers USS Corry DDR - 817 USS C. P. Cecil DDR - 835 USS Stickell DDR - 888 and USS O Hare DDR - 889 On February 6, 1961 I went aboard USS Corry DDR - 817
  • January 1952, she stood out of San Diego in company with USS Arnold J. Isbell and USS Stickell bound for the Korean War once more. After stops at Pearl
  • the Panama Canal on 9 January and anchored briefly at San Diego where Stickell joined the group before continuing west. The destroyers called at Pearl
  • screening exercise followed. Finally, on 28 September, she was relieved by USS Stickell at Pollença Bay, Majorca. On the 30th, Barney headed back to the United
  • September, she assisted in extinguishing a fire in the after engine room of Stickell DD - 888 in November. Through the remainder of 1967 Richard E. Kraus operated
  • Newport, R.I. After assignments as a surface warfare officer on USS Pandemus and USS Stickell he volunteered for service in Vietnam as a lieutenant in command
  • DD - 86, DD - 479 USS Stevens Battery 1862 USS Stevenson DD - 503, DD - 645 USS Stewart DD - 13, DD - 224, DE - 238 USS Stickell DD - 888 DDR - 888 USS Stickleback
  • batteries and suffered no damage. Brinkley Bass and USS Stickell silenced a battery at Kalmagak on March 22. USS Wiltsie received fire from the batteries east
  • 18 December 1941. Kanaris D212 a Gearing - class destroyer, formerly USS Stickell DD - 888 transferred from the U.S. Navy on 1 July 1972. Kanaris F464
  • 1972 1993 The ex - USS Stickell named after admiral and multiple Prime Minister Constantine Kanaris. Kountouriotis D213 1973 1994 The ex - USS Rupertus, named
  • Richard E. Kraus DD - 849 Massey DD - 778 Fred T. Berry DD - 858 and Stickell DD - 888 - Fiske sailed south into the Caribbean, and through the Gulf
  • Lieutenant Stickell bled to death. As a result of his sacrifice and his earlier bravery during previous attacks on enemy installations Lieutenant Stickell was
  • and was anchored off the Yangtze estuary. On 10 January, in company with Stickell and HMS Black Swan, the destroyer shielded the merchant ship. Bausell then
  • to this squadron: USS Forrest Sherman, USS James E. Williams, USS Winston S. Churchill, USS Porter, USS Mahan, USS Mitscher, and USS Laboon. Destroyer
  • Tainan, Taiwan USS Joseph P. Kennedy Jr. in Fall River, Massachusetts ROKS Jeong Ju, ex - Rogers near Cheonan, South Korea and USS Orleck in Lake Charles
  • Kaneohe to Eniwetok in five increments of three aircraft each, arriving at Stickell Field on the 14th. VB - 102 relieved VB - 109 and assumed duties as part of
  • DD - 885 John R. Craig DD - 886 Orleck DD - 887 Brinkley Bass DD - 888 Stickell DD - 889 O Hare DD - 890 Meredith DD - 891 to DD - 926 cancelled Mitscher class

USS Stickell DDR 888 Sailing, Sailing ships, Boat Pinterest.

Download this stock image: USS Stickell underway during operations in the Mediterranean Sea. HG668G from Alamys library of millions of high resolution​. Obituary for Darrell Phillip Hooten The Funeral Chapel. US NAVY DD 888 USS Stickell Patch. USN 1057433 USS STICKELL DDR 888. Where he served during the Korean Conflict aboard the destroyer, U.S.S. Stickell DD 888. While serving, the crew traveled up the Columbia. Uss Stickell Underway during Wall Decal W. In the Korean War, and was on the USS Ashtabula, a fueler, and the USS Stickell, a destroyer. Darrell was an officiator for the USS Ashtabula for veterans. USS Stickell data. After high school, Ernie enlisted with the United States Navy and served aboard the USS Stickell in Okinawa, Pearl Harbor and in the Asiatic Theatre before.

David Lee Turner Collection: Veterans History Project American.

Did you serve with USS STICKELL DDR 888? Looking for someone that served with you? helps reunite veterans from the Navy daily. USS Stickell DD 888 Personalized Canvas Print Navyboy63. USS Stickell DD 888 was a Gearing class destroyer of the United States Navy. She was named for Lieutenant John H. Stickell USNR, who was killed in action at Jaluit Atoll in the Marshall Islands on 13 December 1943 and posthumously awarded the. Willard Stevens Obituary Terre Haute Tribune Star. USS Stickell DD W, o Fleet P. O., San Francisco, Calii. American Consulate Nicosia, Cyprus. Department of State, Washington 25, D. C. Marsh, Richard. Blue Water Navy Vietnam Veterans Act Map Hill & Ponton, P.A. If you or a loved one has been diagnosed with mesothelioma and worked at one of these job sites, contact us for a free, no obligation case evaluation. U.S.S. Stickell Dd 888 Ddr 888 OBrien Law Firm. Mr. Stephens served in the U.S. Navy during Vietnam. He served aboard the USS Stickell DD DDR 888. After his service in the Navy, he served in the Mass.

Ernest Avagianos Conway, Cahill Brodeur Funeral Homes.

Serving in the Korean War, he earned the rank of lieutenant in the U.S. Navy, onboard the navy destroyer USS Stickell, and was honorably discharged in 1955. Obituary of Michael Joseph Trebunak Yanaitis Funeral Home. Gearing class destroyer. Dominic Conaghan, avis de deces Pensacola, FL Dignity Memorial. 6 battle stars Korea 1 battle star. USS Stickell underway during operations in the Mediterranean Sea. People also search for. John Slauter Jr. Obituary The Eagle Tribune. Willard then served aboard the USS Stickell and the USS James E. Kyes, both destroyers, and a part of the Seventh Fleet in the Pacific. He retired.

USS STICKELL DDR 888: Reunite With 6 Other Veterans.

USS Stickell. No description defined. DD 888. In more languages. Spanish. No label defined. No description defined. Traditional Chinese. Obituary Pedro M. Pete Anaya West Funeral Home. Destroyer, USS Stickell. Other tours of duty at sea included postings to the USS Joseph P. Kennedy as the operations officer during the Cuban Missile Crisis. Charles Chuck Robert Aldrich Obituaries. USS Stickell DD 888 Ship Patch Navy Destroyer Ships DD 701 through DD 999 Flying Tigers Surplus. Uss Stickell Gifts CafePress. Free 2 day shipping. Buy USS Stickell DD 888 License Plate Frame at Walmart.​com. Ronald Edward Burbank Trojan Family Magazine USC News. Sid graduated from Happy High School then enlisted in the United States Navy as a gunners mate aboard the USS Stickell. Sid Merchant began his law.

SS 385 USS BANG.

Enlisted Branch of Service: Navy Unit of Service: USS Stickell DDR 888 Location of Service: Korea Highest Rank: First Lieutenant Prisoner of War: No. USS STICKELL DD 888 Framed Navy Ship Display Burgundy. After graduating from Central Catholic High School in 1968, John proudly served four years in the U.S. Navy, on the USS Stickell. He attended. Uss stickell Archives Navy Pictures. USS Stickell DD 888. Personalized canvas print with a unique printed frame. Not just a photo or poster but a work of art! The printed picture is exactly as you.

USS Stickell Tin Can Sailors The National Association of.

A WWII veteran, Les proudly served in the US Navy aboard the USS Stickell. He served in the US Army reserve attaining the rank of 1st Lieutenant. A devote. Richard Longman Brezniak Funeral Directors. Media in category USS Stickell DD 888. The following 7 files are in this category, out of 7 total. USS Sickel 1.050 × 1.050 4.22 MB. USS Stickell Dd 888 Street Vinyl Decal Sticker – SignMission. USS STICKELL DD 888 Deployments & History. Obituary Leslie F. Volmert Birmingham Martin Funeral Home. USS Stickell underway during operations in the Mediterranean Sea, Poster Print by Stocktrek Images is a licensed reproduction that was printed on P. Navy USS Stickell DD 888 Navy Veteran Locator. Mar 12, 2017 This Pin was discovered by Debbie Adams. Discover and save! your own Pins on Pinterest.

Tracy Wilder Obituary 2013 San Luis Obispo County Tribune.

If you built, repaired or served on board the USS Stickell DD 888 and have been diagnosed with Mesothelioma, Lung Cancer or Asbestosis, Shepard Law can. USS Stickell DDR 888 Ship Print Destroyers S T Pr. Childhood Bronx neighborhood Naval service on the USS Stickell years living in southern California membership with the Catholic Slovak Club in Yonkers,. USS STICKELL DD 888 South Vietnam Veteran Ribbon Etsy. He was a member of the American Legion Post 71, VFW Post 4258, Telephone Pioneers, USS Stickell Reunion, U.S. Navy Memorial, Richard Bong Veterans. Signal Corps 111 ADC 7949 Card 1 of 3 RG 111 Accession III NAV. Mr. Stephens served in the U.S. Navy during Vietnam. He served aboard the USS Stickell DD DDR 888. After his service in the Navy, he served in the Mass. Следующая Войти Настройки.

Obituary of Sid Merchant The Hamil Family Funeral Home located.

DD DDR, John Mordovanec, GMG3, 5 60 9 1963, Johnmo442 AT. DD DDR 888, Vincent Andrus, QM2, 12 59 8 61, ent AT yahoo. USS Stickell DD 888 License Plate Frame - Walmart. Get this from a library! Hachi, hachi, hachi USS Stickell world cruise, 1954. USS Stickell DD 888 pedia. Tracys lifelong dream was realized in 1960 when he was named skipper of the destroyer USS Stickell, which would become one of the first Navy warships to. HyperWar: USS Stickell DD 888 Ibiblio. USS St. Francis River LSMR 525, USS Stickell DD 888, USS Stoddard DD 566​, USS Stone County LST 1141, USS Strong DD 758, USS Summit County LST.

Themistoklis Kanaris Gearing class Destroyer FRAM Hellenic Navy.

USS Stickell. 81 likes. Company. USS Stickell DD 888 Ship Patch Flying Tigers Surplus. Title: USS STICKELL DDR 888. Caption: Underway during operations in the Mediterranean Sea, 18 December 1960. Description: Catalog: USN 1057433. Obituary of Edward Ruzsbatzky William F Hogan Funeral Home. USS STICKELL DD 888 South Vietnam Veteran Ribbon Vinyl Silkscreen Shirt or Sweatshirts.

DD 888 USS Stickell Patch Destroyer Patches Navy Patches.

He served aboard the USS Tidewater, the USS Stickell, the USS Mississippi, and the USS James M. Gilliss, to name a few. In April of 1968, Stan received a letter. Chances in membership Wiley Online Library. In the 2013 remand, the Board requested that all available deck logs be obtained for the periods that the Veterans ship, the U.S.S. Stickell, was in the waters. Guy C. Stephens 1943 ∼ 2014 Chapman, Cole & Gleason. Armament 6 x 5 38AA 3x2, 12 x 40mm AA, 11 x 20mm AA, 10 x 21 tt. 2x5. Machinery, 60.000 SHP Westinghouse Turbines, 2 screws. Speed, 36.8 Knots,. Asbestos Exposure USS Stickell DD 888 Shepard Law. This is a beautiful ship display commemorating the USS STICKELL DD 888 and all those who served aboard. Pin on A Sailors Ship USS Dyess DDR 880 Pinterest. D 211 HS Miaoulis ex USS Ingraham DD 694 1944 71 US Gearing FRAM I: D 212 HS Kanaris ex USS Stickell DD 888 1945 72 D 213 HS Kountouriotis.

Obituary of John Olson Funeral Homes & Cremation Services Betz,.

Bert honorably served his country in the U.S. Navy aboard the destroyer U.S.S. Stickell in both WWII and the Korean War. While stationed in San Diego, he met. USS STICKELL DD 888 Deployments & History. Ships of the U.S. Navy, 1940 1945. DD 888 USS Stickell. Gearing Class Destroyer: Displacement: 2425 tons Length: 3906 Beam: 4010. USS STICKELL DD 888 Rates Apparel Military Best. Sr. and Gertrude Schotts Olson Olechowski. A 1958 graduate of Wilbur H. Lynch High School, John then entered the US Navy. He served on the USS Stickell.

Obituary Berton Arthur Riech McAulay & Wallace Mortuary.

USS Stickell DDR 888 underway in 1958. Stickell was assigned to the battle group of the USS Franklin D. Roosevelt CVA 42, from which this photo was taken. Hachi, hachi, hachi USS Stickell world cruise, 1954. Book, 1954. DescriptionThis 3 pack of Awesome USS Stickell Dd 888 Street Sign Decals for your Car, Office, or Laptop are a great way show off your personality. Looking for​. USS Stickell DD 888 Gemini 6 Atlantic Recovery Force Flight. USS Stickell DD 888 was a Gearing class destroyer of the United States Navy. She was named for Lieutenant John H. Stickell USNR 1914–1943, who was. Obituary of Stanley Francis Kemp Heintz Funeral Service is dedica. Thanks to Rich Shaver who filmed this when he was a Radioman on the USS Stickell DD 888 over 50 years ago. Interview with. Al Cadenhead Veteran of.


Military

Stickell (DD-888) was laid down on 5 January 1945 at Orange, Tex., by the Consolidated Shipbuilding Corp. launched on 16 June 1945, sponsored by Miss Sue Stickell and commissioned on 31 October 1945, Comdr. Francis E. Fleck in command.

for a month, 10 December 1945 to 11 January 1946. She then conducted shakedown training out of Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, before arriving in Charleston, S.C., on 11 March for post-shakedown availability. She shifted to Norfolk, Va., on 21 April and, until 6 May, supported carrier qualifications from that port with Kearsarge (CV-33). She then screened Kearsarge to Guantanamo Bay and, from there, to the Panama Canal. She returned to Norfolk on 13 June. Two days later, she got underway for the west coast. Heading via the Panama Canal, she reached San Diego, Calif., on 29 June and joined Destroyer Division (DesDiv) 11. Over the next four and one-half years, Stickell made three cruises to the Far East to serve with the 7th Fleet. During these deployments, she visited the Philippines, the Marianas, Japan, China, and Okinawa. After each tour of duty in the western Pacific, she returned to duty along the west coast and in Hawaiian waters. Drills and exercises occupied the bulk of her time during the postwar period.

On 6 November 1950, Stickell completed overhaul at Mare Island Naval Shipyard and sailed for the Korean War Zone with DesDiv 52. She made Sasebo, Japan, on the 27th and, three days later, joined the screen of Task Force (TF) 77. The destroyer's first Korean War tour lasted until 20 July 1951. During that deployment, she operated with the fast carriers off the southern and eastern coasts of Korea, participated in antisubmarine warfare exercises off Yokosuka, Japan, conducted shore bombardments of the Songjin-Wonsan area and patrolled the waters off Shingjin, Yong-do and Chongjin for enemy small craft. In addition, she landed Republic of Korea intelligence teams on hostile shores: and she rescued three air crewmen while on lifeguard duty for the carriers. On 20 July 1951, she headed east toward the United States and arrived in San Diego, Calif., on 4 August.

For almost seven months, Stickell remained on the west coast, conducting training operations out of San Diego. On 26 January 1952, she put to sea for the Far East once again. After stopping at Yokosuka from 19 to 23 February, she began her second combat tour in Korean waters. Between 23 February and 19 March, she operated with TF 77 off the coast of Korea and made three shore bombardments, one off Yong-do on 28 February with Rochester (CA-124), one at the bombline on 5 March and one off Singchong-Ni on 11 March with Saint Paul (CA-73). On the 19th, Stickell and the rest of DesDiv 52 joined the United Nations blockading and escort force, Task Group (TG) 95.2. As the bombardment and patrol element, Stickell not only blockaded Hungnam, but also delivered interdiction and shore bombardment fire.

After bombarding Wonsan Harbor on 31 March, she rejoined TF 77 on 1 April and retired with that force to Yokosuka. She remained at Yokosuka during the first two weeks in April, then resumed support for TF 77 air strikes and intermittent shore bombardments. She was in Yokosuka from 29 May to 18 June for drydocking and repairs before conducting a brief operation along Korea's east coast, including a night landing in the vicinity of Pohang Dong. Stickell cleared the area on 23 June with DesDiv 52 for exercises out of Buckner Bay, Okinawa. The division returned to Yokosuka on 5 July and, on the 6th, was underway again to visit Hong Kong and to patrol the Taiwan Strait. She rendezvoused with Carrier Division 3 on the 14th and, with TG 50.3, conducted operations in the Philippines and in the South China Sea, before returning to the Taiwan area to rejoin TF 77 on the 27th. After further operations off the eastern coast of Korea, she entered Yokosuka on 6 August and, four days later, sailed for return to the United States.

Stickell arrived in San Diego on 26 August and remained there until 13 December, when she was decommissioned at Long Beach to begin conversion to a radar picket destroyer (DDR). On 2 September 1953 Stickell (DDR-888) was recommissioned at Long Beach, Comdr. James Boyd in command. Following training out of Long Beach, she joined DesDiv 21 at San Diego on 18 January 1954. Two days later, she and her division headed for the western Pacific. This deployment consisted primarily of hunter-killer training and Taiwan Strait patrol. On 1 June, she departed Sasebo on a voyage to complete a circumnavigation of the globe. Along the way, she visited Hong Kong, Singapore, Ceylon, Kenya, South Africa, Brazil, and Trinidad. She reached Norfolk, Va., on 10 August 1954 and joined DesDiv 262 of the Atlantic Fleet.

For the next nine years, Stickell served the Atlantic Fleet as a radar destroyer. Between 1954 and 1958, she went through two complete training cycles, including yard overhauls, Mediterranean deployments refresher training, and NATO and Atlantic Fleet exercises. She received the latest in electronic equipment during her 1958 overhaul and, soon thereafter, she was outfitted with an experimental data processing and weapons analysis system. In 1961, she earned the Atlantic Fleet Destroyer force Antiair Warfare Trophy. Her seven-month Mediterranean cruise in 1962 was highlighted by an excursion into the Black Sea. In the fall of 1962, Stickell participated in the Cuban Quarantine and showed great efficiency by departing Norfolk on very short notice to assume her station.

In May 1963, she entered the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard for a Fleet Rehabilitation and Modernization (FRAM) overhaul. Stickell surrendered her antiaircraft warfare electronics equipment in return for the latest in ASW gear, including ASROC missiles and DASH helicopters. Early in 1964, she rejoined the Atlantic Fleet in Destroyer Squadron (DesRon) 12 as a straight DD. Home ported at Newport, R.I., she became the flagship of DesDiv 122. Following refresher training in April, she became a unit of the midshipman training squadron and made a cruise to northern European ports in June and July. From August to November, she served with the Atlantic Antisubmarine Warfare Forces then she deployed to the Mediterranean until March 1965.

She returned to Newport and, in April, shifted to Norfolk to complete her DASH outfitting. In June, Stickell joined TF 124, in supporting United States and other OAS forces operating in the Dominican Republic during the 1965 upheavals in that country. After five weeks of patrolling, she entered the Bethlehem Steel Corp. shipyard at Boston, Mass., for a six week overhaul. In October, she took station off the west coast of Africa to participate in the recovery of Gemini 6. However, the mission was scrubbed, and Stickell returned, via Martinique, to Newport. In November and early December, she participated in amphibious exercises at Vieques Island, near Puerto Rico then returned to Newport.

On 19 January 1966, Stickell, along with the other units of Destroyer Squadron 12, departed Newport for duty with the 7th Fleet in the Far East. After transiting the Panama Canal and brief stops at San Diego and Pearl Harbor, the ship commenced wartime operations in the South China Sea in support of the Republic of South Vietnam. While attached to the 7th Fleet, Stickell was assigned to Search and Rescue (SAR) and helicopter inflight refueling duties in the Tonkin Gulf plane guarding for various attack carriers, especially Ranger ( CVA-61), and gunfire support duties. During the deployment, the ship visited the following Far East ports: Kaohsinng, Formosa Yokosuka, Japan Subic Bay, Philippines Hong Kong and Naha, Okinawa. En route back to Newport completely circumnavigating the world Stickell visited Port Dickson, Malaya Cochin, India and Aden. She transited the Suez and touched at Athens, Greece Palma, Mallorca, and Gibraltar. The ship returned to Newport on 17 August 1966.

1967 and headed toward Guantanamo Bay for refresher training. Stickell then headed for Culebra Island where she qualified as a naval gunfire support ship. After a short inport period, Stickell deployed on a four month ASW cruise. During the northern European segment of the cruise, Stickell visited Bergen Norway Aarjus, Denmark Sundsvall, Sweden and Thurso, Scotland. She operated with ships and aircraft from the navies of Norway, Denmark, West Germany Great Britain, and France. Stickell then entered the Mediterranean Sea and joined the 6th Fleet. She operated with Essex (CVS-9) and several other destroyers as a "pouncer" ASW Task Force. While in the Mediterranean, Stickell visited Naples, Italy Valletta, Malta, and Palermo, Sicily. On 19 September 1967, she steamed past Brenton Reef Light and was home again.

Before the end of the year, Stickell participated in two ASW exercises. The first, "Canus Silex," a combined Canadian-United States ASW exercise and the second, "Fixwex India." By February 1968, Stickell was preparing for a visit to the Caribbean and her part in "Springboard 68." After leaving frozen Newport behind, Stickell participated in a variety of training operations designed to sharpen her crew's already finely honed efficiency. Following Springboard, she acted as sonar training ship at the Fleet Antisubmarine Warfare School at Key West, Florida.

The next several months were spent preparing for Stickell's next deployment. On 2 July 1968, Stickell left Newport for a six-month, 13-nation cruise of the Indian Ocean as part of the Navy's Middle East Force. She visited San Juan, Puerto Rico Recife, Brazil Luanda, Angola Lorenco Marques, Mozambique Port Louis, Mauritius, Cochin, India, Karachi, Pakistan Bahrain Massawa, Ethiopia Mombasa, Kenya Assah, Ethiopia Bandar Abbas, Iran Bushire, Iran Kuwait and Dakar, Senegal touching some ports more than once. While in the Persian Gulf area, Stickell participated in the international naval exercise "Middlinx XI." Together with units of the United States, British, and Iranian navies, Stickell once again demonstrated her readiness in the fields of antisubmarine and antiaircraft warfare. Stickell returned home on 10 January 1969.

Over the next three years, Stickell alternated deployments with operations off the east coast of the United States and in the Caribbean Sea. She was deployed to the Mediterranean again from September 1969 until late March 1970, when she returned to Norfolk. After post-deployment leave and upkeep, she headed to Davisville, R.I., on 18 May for a month of hull repairs. Back in Norfolk again on 20 June, she remained there, except for two brief operations with John F. Kennedy (CVA-67) in July, until 9 November when she got underway to off-load ammunition at Yorktown, in preparation for drydocking at Newport News, Va., from 13 November until 7 December. For the remainder of the year, she prepared for deployment to the Indian Ocean. Her second deployment with the Middle Eastern Force began on 7 January 1971, when she put to sea from Norfolk and ended on 29 June, upon her return to Norfolk. In the meantime she visited ports in Brazil, Angola, Mozambique, Madagascar, Mauritius, Bahrein, Saudi Arabia, Ethiopia, Iran, India, Pakistan, Kenya, and Senegal.

At the end of this, her last, deployment, Stickell remained in the Virginia Capes area for the most part at anchor or in port. She spent most of the remainder of 1971 and the first half of 1972 preparing for decommissioning and transfer to the government of Greece. On 1 July 1972, Stickell was decommissioned and struck from the Navy list. Immediately thereafter, the Greek Navy took possession of her and recommissioned her as Kanaris (D-212).

Stickell (DD-888) earned six battle stars for Korean War service and one for service in the Vietnam War.


Our Newsletter

Product Description

USS Stickell DD 888

World Cruise

January 1954 - August 1954 Cruise Book

Bring the Cruise Book to Life with this Multimedia Presentation

This CD will Exceed your Expectations

A great part of Naval history.

You would be purchasing the USS Stickell DD 888 cruise book during this time period. Each page has been placed on a CD for years of enjoyable computer viewing. The CD comes in a plastic sleeve with a custom label. Every page has been enhanced and is readable. Rare cruise books like this sell for a hundred dollars or more when buying the actual hard copy if you can find one for sale.

This would make a great gift for yourself or someone you know who may have served aboard her. Usually only ONE person in the family has the original book. The CD makes it possible for other family members to have a copy also. You will not be disappointed we guarantee it.

Some of the items in this book are as follows:

  • Ports of Call: San Diego, Honolulu, Midway Island, Yokosuka, Sasebo, Kaohsiung Taiwan, Hong Kong, Kobe, Singapore, Columbo, Durban South Africa, Capetown S.A., Rio de Janeiro Brasil, trinidad Spain and Norfolk.
  • Divisional Group Photos with Names
  • Crossing the Equator
  • Many Crew Activity Photos
  • Plus Much More

Over 155 Photos on Approximately 63 Pages.

Once you view this book you will know what life was like on this Destroyer during this time period.

Additional Bonus:

  • 20 Minute Audio of a " 1967 Equator Crossing " (Not this ship but the Ceremony is Traditional)
  • 6 Minute Audio of " Sounds of Boot Camp " in the late 50's early 60's
  • Other Interesting Items Include:
    • The Oath of Enlistment
    • The Sailors Creed
    • Core Values of the United States Navy
    • Military Code of Conduct
    • Navy Terminology Origins (8 Pages)
    • Examples: Scuttlebutt, Chewing the Fat, Devil to Pay,
    • Hunky-Dory and many more.

    Why a CD instead of a hard copy book?

    • The pictures will not be degraded over time.
    • Self contained CD no software to load.
    • Thumbnails, table of contents and index for easy viewing reference.
    • View as a digital flip book or watch a slide show. (You set the timing options)
    • Back ground patriotic music and Navy sounds can be turned on or off.
    • Viewing options are described in the help section.
    • Bookmark your favorite pages.
    • The quality on your screen may be better than a hard copy with the ability to magnify any page.
    • Full page viewing slide show that you control with arrow keys or mouse.
    • Designed to work on a Microsoft platform. (Not Apple or Mac) Will work with Windows 98 or above.

    Personal Comment from "Navyboy63"

    The cruise book CD is a great inexpensive way of preserving historical family heritage for yourself, children or grand children especially if you or a loved one has served aboard the ship. It is a way to get connected with the past especially if you no longer have the human connection.

    If your loved one is still with us, they might consider this to be a priceless gift. Statistics show that only 25-35% of sailors purchased their own cruise book. Many probably wished they would have. It's a nice way to show them that you care about their past and appreciate the sacrifice they and many others made for you and the FREEDOM of our country. Would also be great for school research projects or just self interest in World War II documentation.

    We never knew what life was like for a sailor in World War II until we started taking an interest in these great books. We found pictures which we never knew existed of a relative who served on the USS Essex CV 9 during World War II. He passed away at a very young age and we never got a chance to hear many of his stories. Somehow by viewing his cruise book which we never saw until recently has reconnected the family with his legacy and Naval heritage. Even if we did not find the pictures in the cruise book it was a great way to see what life was like for him. We now consider these to be family treasures. His children, grand children and great grand children can always be connected to him in some small way which they can be proud of. This is what motivates and drives us to do the research and development of these great cruise books. I hope you can experience the same thing for your family.

    If you have any questions please send us an E-mail prior to purchasing.

    Buyer pays shipping and handling. Shipping charges outside the US will vary by location.

    Check our feedback. Customers who have purchased these CD's have been very pleased with the product.

    Be sure to add us to your !

    Thanks for your Interest!


    Powered by
    The free listing tool. List your items fast and easy and manage your active items.

    This CD is for your personal use only

    Copyright © 2003-2010 Great Naval Images LLC. All rights reserved.


    Service history

    1945�

    Stickell (DD-888) was laid down on 5 January 1945 at Orange, Texas, by the Consolidated Steel Corporation launched on 16 June 1945 sponsored by Miss Sue Stickell and commissioned on 31 October 1945, Comdr. Francis E. Fleck in command.

    Assigned to the Atlantic Fleet, Stickell operated under Commander, Amphibious Training, Galveston, Texas, for a month, 10 December 1945 to 11 January 1946. She then conducted shakedown training out of Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, before arriving in Charleston, South Carolina, on 11 March for post-shakedown availability. She shifted to Norfolk, Virginia, on 21 April and, until 6 May, supported carrier qualifications from that port with Kearsarge  (CV-33) . She then screened Kearsarge to Guantanamo Bay and, from there, to the Panama Canal. She returned to Norfolk on 13 June. Two days later, she got underway for the west coast. Heading via the Panama Canal, she reached San Diego, California, on 29 June and joined Destroyer Division (DesDiv) 11. Over the next four and one-half years, Stickell made three cruises to the Far East to serve with the 7th Fleet. During these deployments, she visited the Philippines, the Marianas, Japan, North and South Korea, China, and Okinawa. After each tour of duty in the western Pacific, she returned to duty along the west coast and in Hawaiian waters. Drills and exercises occupied the bulk of her time during the postwar period.

    Korea, 1950�

    On 6 November 1950, Stickell completed overhaul at Mare Island Naval Shipyard and sailed for the Korean War Zone with DesDiv 52. She made Sasebo, Japan, on 27 November and, three days later, joined the screen of Task Force (TF) 77. The destroyer&aposs first Korean War tour lasted until 20 July 1951. During that deployment, she operated with the fast carriers off the southern and eastern coasts of Korea, participated in anti-submarine warfare exercises off Yokosuka, Japan, conducted shore bombardments of the Songjin-Wonsan area and patrolled the waters off Shingjin, Yong-do, and Chongjin for enemy small craft. In addition, she landed Republic of Korea intelligence teams on hostile shores: and she rescued three air crewmen while on lifeguard duty for the carriers. On 20 July 1951, she headed east toward the United States and arrived in San Diego, California, on 4 August.

    For almost seven months, Stickell remained on the west coast, conducting training operations out of San Diego. On 26 January 1952, she put to sea for the Far East once again. After stopping at Yokosuka from 19 to 23 February, she began her second combat tour in Korean waters. Between 23 February and 19 March, she operated with TF 77 off the coast of Korea and made three shore bombardments one off Yong-do on 28 February with heavy cruiser Rochester one at the bombline on 5 March and one off Singchong-Ni on 11 March with the cruiser Saint Paul. On 19 March, Stickell and the rest of DesDiv 52 joined the United Nations blockading and escort force, Task Group (TG) 95.2. As the bombardment and patrol element, Stickell not only blockaded Hŭngnam, but also delivered interdiction and shore bombardment fire.

    After bombarding Wonsan Harbor on 31 March, she rejoined TF 77 on 1 April and retired with that force to Yokosuka. She remained at Yokosuka during the first two weeks in April then resumed support for TF 77 air strikes and intermittent shore bombardments. She was in Yokosuka from 29 May to 18 June for dry-docking and repairs before conducting a brief operation along Korea&aposs east coast, including a night landing in the vicinity of Pohang Dong. Stickell cleared the area on 23 June with DesDiv 52 for exercises out of Buckner Bay, Okinawa. The division returned to Yokosuka on 5 July and, the next day, was underway again to visit Hong Kong and to patrol the Taiwan Strait. She rendezvoused with Carrier Division 3 on 14 July and, with TG 50.3, conducted operations in the Philippines and in the South China Sea, before returning to the Taiwan area to rejoin TF 77 on 27 July. After further operations off the eastern coast of Korea, she entered Yokosuka on 6 August and, four days later, sailed for return to the United States.

    1953�

    Stickell arrived in San Diego on 26 August and remained there until 13 December, when she was decommissioned at Long Beach to begin conversion to a radar picket destroyer (DDR). On 2 September 1953, Stickell (DDR-888) was recommissioned at Long Beach, Comdr. James Boyd in command. Following training out of Long Beach, she joined DesDiv 21 at San Diego on 18 January 1954. Two days later, she and her division headed for the western Pacific. This deployment consisted primarily of hunter-killer training and Taiwan Strait patrol. On 1 June, she departed Sasebo on a voyage to complete a circumnavigation of the globe. Along the way, she visited Hong Kong, Singapore, Ceylon, Kenya, South Africa, Brazil, and Trinidad, She reached Norfolk, Virginia, on 10 August 1954 and joined DesDiv 262 of the Atlantic Fleet.

    For the next nine years, Stickell served the Atlantic Fleet as a radar destroyer. Between 1954 and 1958, she went through two complete training cycles, including yard overhauls, Mediterranean deployments, refresher training, and NATO and Atlantic Fleet exercises. She received the latest in electronic equipment during her 1958 overhaul and, soon thereafter, she was outfitted with an experimental data processing and weapons analysis system. In 1961, she earned the Atlantic Fleet Destroyer force Antiair Warfare Trophy. Her seven-month Mediterranean cruise in 1962 was highlighted by an excursion into the Black Sea. In the fall of 1962, Stickell participated in the Cuban Quarantine and showed great efficiency by departing Norfolk on very short notice to assume her station.

    1963�

    In May 1963, she entered the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard for a Fleet Rehabilitation and Modernization (FRAM) overhaul. Stickell surrendered her anti-aircraft warfare electronics equipment in return for the latest in ASW gear, including ASROC missiles and DASH drone helicopters. Early in 1964, she rejoined the Atlantic Fleet in Destroyer Squadron (DesRon) 12 as a straight DD. Home ported at Newport, Rhode Island, she became the flagship of DesDiv 122. Following refresher training in April, she became a unit of the midshipman training squadron and made a cruise to northern European ports in June and July. From August to November, she served with the Atlantic Anti-submarine Warfare Forces then she deployed to the Mediterranean until March 1965.

    She returned to Newport and, in April, shifted to Norfolk to complete her DASH outfitting. In June, Stickell joined TF 124, in supporting United States and other OAS forces operating in the Dominican Republic during the 1965 upheavals in that country. After five weeks of patrolling, she entered the Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation shipyard at Boston, Massachusetts, for a six-week overhaul. In October, she took station off the west coast of Africa to participate in the recovery of Gemini 6. However, the mission was scrubbed, and Stickell returned, via Martinique, to Newport. In November and early December, she participated in amphibious exercises at Vieques Island, near Puerto Rico then returned to Newport.

    Vietnam, 1966

    On 19 January 1966, Stickell, along with the other units of Destroyer Squadron 12, departed Newport for duty with the 7th Fleet in the Far East. After transiting the Panama Canal and brief stops at San Diego and Pearl Harbor, the ship commenced wartime operations in the South China Sea in support of the Republic of Vietnam. While attached to the 7th Fleet, Stickell was assigned to Search and Rescue (SAR) and helicopter inflight refueling duties in the Gulf of Tonkin plane guarding for various attack carriers, especially Ranger and gunfire support duties. During the deployment, the ship visited the following Far East ports: Kaohsiung, Formosa Yokosuka, Japan Subic Bay, Philippines Hong Kong route back to Newport — completely circumnavigating the world — crossing the equator near Indonesia. After the Stickell visited Port Dickson, Malaysia Cochin, India and Aden. She transited the Suez Canal and touched at Athens, Greece Palma, Mallorca and Gibraltar. ship returned to Newport on 17 August 1966.

    1966�

    In October 1966, Stickell entered the Boston Naval Shipyard for overhaul. She emerged in February 1967 and headed toward Guantánamo Bay for refresher training. Stickell then headed for Culebra Island where she qualified as a naval gunfire support ship. After a short inport period, Stickell deployed on a four-month ASW cruise. During the northern European segment of the cruise, Stickell visited Bergen, Norway Aarhus, Denmark Sundsvall, Sweden and Thurso, Scotland. She operated with ships and aircraft from the navies of Norway, Denmark, West Germany, Great Britain, and France. Stickell then entered the Mediterranean Sea and joined the 6th Fleet. She operated with the aircraft carrier Essex and several other destroyers as a "pouncer" ASW Task Force. While in the Mediterranean, Stickell visited Naples, Italy Valletta, Malta and Palermo, Sicily. On 19 September 1967, she steamed past Brenton Reef Light and was home again.

    Before the end of the year, Stickell participated in two ASW exercises. The first, "Canus Silex," a combined Canadian-United States ASW exercise and the second, "Fixwex India." By February 1968, Stickell was preparing for a visit to the Caribbean and her part in "Springboard 68." After leaving frozen Newport behind, Stickell participated in a variety of training operations designed to sharpen her crew&aposs already finely honed efficiency. Following "Springboard", she acted as sonar training ship at the Fleet Antisubmarine Warfare School at Key West, Florida.

    The next several months were spent preparing for Stickell &apos s next deployment. On 2 July 1968, Stickell left Newport for a six-month, 13-nation cruise of the Indian Ocean as part of the Navy&aposs Middle East Force. She visited San Juan, Puerto Rico Recife, Brazil Luanda, Angola Lourenço Marques, Mozambique Port Louis, Mauritius Cochin, India Karachi, Pakistan Bahrain Massawa, Ethiopia Mombasa, Kenya Assab, Ethiopia Bandar Abbas, Iran Bushehr, Iran Kuwait and Dakar, Senegal — touching some ports more than once. While in the Persian Gulf area, Stickell participated in the international naval exercise "Middlinx XL". Together with units of the United States, British, and Iranian navies, Stickell once again demonstrated her readiness in the fields of anti-submarine and anti-aircraft warfare. Stickell returned home on 10 January 1969.

    1969�

    Over the next three years, Stickell alternated deployments with operations off the east coast of the United States and in the Caribbean Sea. She was deployed to the Mediterranean again from September 1969 until late March 1970, when she returned to Norfolk, After post-deployment leave and upkeep, she headed to Davisville, Rhode Island, on 18 May for a month of hull repairs. Back in Norfolk again on 20 June, she remained there, except for two brief operations with the aircraft carrier John F. Kennedy in July, until 9 November when she got underway to off-load ammunition at Yorktown, in preparation for drydocking at Newport News, Virginia, from 13 November until 7 December. For the remainder of the year, she prepared for deployment to the Indian Ocean. Her second deployment with the Middle Eastern Force began on 7 January 1971, when she put to sea from Norfolk and ended on 29 June, upon her return to Norfolk. In the meantime, she visited ports in Brazil, Angola, Mozambique, Madagascar, Mauritius, Bahrein, Saudi Arabia, Ethiopia, Iran, India, Pakistan, Kenya, and Senegal.

    At the end of this, her last, deployment, Stickell remained in the Virginia Capes area - for the most part at anchor or in port. She spent most of the remainder of 1971 and the first half of 1972 preparing for decommissioning and transfers to the government of Greece. On 1 July 1972, Stickell was decommissioned and struck from the Navy list. Immediately thereafter, the Greek Navy took possession of her and recommissioned her as Kanaris (D212).


    Stickell DD-888 - History

    January 1954 - August 1954 Cruise Book

    Bring the Cruise Book to Life with this Multimedia Presentation

    This CD will Exceed your Expectations

    A great part of naval history.

    You would be purchasing an exact copy of the USS Stickell DD 888 cruise book during this time period. Each page has been placed on a CD for years of enjoyable computer viewing. The CD comes in a plastic sleeve with a custom label. Every page has been enhanced and is readable. Rare cruise books like this sell for a hundred dollars or more when buying the actual hard copy if you can find one for sale.

    This would make a great gift for yourself or someone you know who may have served aboard her. Usually only ONE person in the family has the original book. The CD makes it possible for other family members to have a copy also. You will not be disappointed we guarantee it.

    Some of the items in this book are as follows:

    • Ports of Call: San Diego, Honolulu, Midway Island, Yokosuka, Sasebo, Kaohsiung Taiwan, Hong Kong, Kobe, Singapore, Colombo, Durban South Africa, Cape town S.A., Rio de Janeiro Brazil , Trinidad Spain and Norfolk .
    • Divisional Group Photos with Names
    • Crossing the Equator
    • Many Crew Activity Photos
    • Plus Much More

    Over 155 Photos on Approximately 63 Pages.

    Once you view this book you will know what life was like on this Destroyer during this time period.


    Watch the video: Магнитофон-приставка Электроника 004-Стерео