Barton DD- 599 - History

Barton DD- 599 - History

Barton

Born In Philadelphia 7 April 1853, John Kennedy Barton graduated from the Academy in 1873. He served as Engineer-in-Chief and Chief of the Bureau of Steam Engineering with the rank of Rear Admiral. He retired 23 December 1908. Rear Admiral Barton died in Philadelphia 23 December 1921.

(DD-599: dp. 1620; 1. 347'9"; b. 36;1"; dr. 17'4"; s.
276; a. 5 5", 10 21" TT.;

The first Barton (DD-599) was launched 3i January 1942 by Bethlehem Steel Co., Quincy, Mass.; sponsored by Miss Barbara Dean Barton, granddaughter of Admiral Barton; and commissioned 29 May 1942, Lieutenant Commander D. H. Fox in command.

Barton departed the east coast 23 August 1942 and steamed to the Pacific, arriving at Tongatabu, Tonga Islands, 14 September 1942. During October she participated in the Buin-Faisi-Tonolai raid (5 October) and the Battle of Santa Cruz (26 October). On 29 October she successfully rescued 17 survivors of two downed air transports near Fabre Island.

Against great odds on 13 November Barton, in company with Rear Admiral D. J. Callaghan's landing support group, took part in the Naval Battle of Guadalcanal. Barton commenced firing on the Japanese ships at approximately 0148. After launching four torpedoes she had to come to an emergency stop to avoid a collision. While she was practically dead in the water, two enemy torpedoes found their mark. The first torpedo struck her forward fireroom and, a few seconds later, a second torpedo struck her forward engine-room. Within seconds, Barton broke in two and sank, carrying with her an estimated 90 percent of her valiant crew. Forty-two survivors were rescued by Portland (CA-33) and Higgins boats from Guadalcanal.

Barton received four battle stars for her service during October and November 1942.


USS Barton (i) (DD 599)

USS Barton (Lt.Cdr. Douglas Harold Fox, USN) was sunk in the naval battle of Guadalcanal when 2 torpedoes from the Japanese destroyer Amatsukaze (offsite link) struck her in the forward magazines, splitting the ship in half. The stern sank instantly while the bow stayed afloat for 10 minutes. Many were killed as the depth charges went off in the water. Shells from enemy ships also landed among the survivors. 165 men were killed and 68 survived.

Commands listed for USS Barton (i) (DD 599)

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1Lt.Cdr. Douglas Harold Fox, USN29 May 194213 Nov 1942 (+)

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Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships

The first Barton (DD-599) was launched 31 January 1942 by Bethlehem Steel Co., Quincy, Mass. sponsored by Miss Barbara Dean Barton, granddaughter of Admiral Barton and commissioned 29 May 1942, Lieutenant Commander D. H. Fox in command.

Barton departed the east coast 23 August 1942 and steamed to the Pacific, arriving at Tongatabu, Tonga Islands, 14 September 1942. During October she participated in the Buin-Faisi-Tonolai raid (5 October) and the Battle of Santa Cruz (26 October). On 29 October she successfully rescued 17 survivors of two downed air transports near Fabre Island.

Against great odds on 13 November Barton, in company with Rear Admiral D. J. Callaghan's landing support group, took part in the Naval Battle of Guadalcanal. Barton commenced firing on the Japanese ships at approximately 0148. After launching four torpedoes she had to come to an emergency stop to avoid a collision. While she was practically dead in the water, two enemy torpedoes found their mark. The first torpedo struck her forward fireroom and, a few seconds later, a second torpedo struck her forward engine-room. Within seconds, Barton broke in two and sank, carrying with her an estimated 90 percent of her valiant crew. Forty-two survivors were rescued by Portland (CA-33) and Higgins boats from Guadalcanal.

Barton received four battle stars for her service during October and November 1942. Transcribed and formatted for HTML by Patrick Clancey, HyperWar Foundation


USS Barton (DD-599)


Figure 1: USS Barton (DD-599) in Boston Harbor, Boston, Massachusetts, 29 May 1942, the day she was commissioned. Official US Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 2: USS Barton (DD-599) in Boston Harbor, Boston, Massachusetts, on the day she was commissioned, 29 May 1942. Official US Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 3: USS Barton (DD-599), date and place unknown. US Navy Photograph. Click on photograph for larger image.

Named after John Kennedy Barton (1853-1921), a former Chief of the US Navy’s Bureau of Steam Engineering, USS Barton was a 1,620-ton Benson class destroyer that was built by the Bethlehem Steel Company at Quincy, Massachusetts, and was commissioned on 29 May 1942. The ship was approximately 348 feet long and 36 feet wide, had a top speed of 37 knots, and had a crew of 208 officers and men. Barton was armed with four 5-inch guns, four 40-mm guns, seven 20-mm guns, 10 21-inch torpedo tubes, and depth charges.

Following a brief shakedown cruise off the coast of Maine, Barton began escorting various ships off the New England coastline starting in July 1942. She was ordered to the Pacific on 23 August and, after transiting the Panama Canal at the end of August, Barton joined Task Group (TG) 2.12 at the Tonga Islands, arriving at Tongatabu on 12 September. Shortly after that, Barton sailed to Noumea, New Caledonia.

At this time, the battle for Guadalcanal was being fought in earnest. On 2 October 1942, Barton joined Task Force 17 which was leaving Noumea and headed for the Shortland Islands, where Japanese forces were rumored to be gathering for an attack on Guadalcanal. Task Force 17 was built around the carrier USS Hornet (CV-8), along with two heavy cruisers, two light cruisers, and four other destroyers. By 5 October, Hornet’s planes reached the Shortland Islands and, although plagued by bad weather, damaged two Japanese destroyers and sank one transport. But the bulk of the Japanese fleet was not there.

By now, the Japanese were desperate to destroy the one major airstrip held by the Americans on Guadalcanal, called Henderson Field. Whoever controlled the airstrip controlled the skies and the shipping around Guadalcanal, which made the airfield such an important target. The Japanese began daily air raids against the airfield and mounted nightly bombardments by surface warships as well. The Japanese then sent a major task force to engage the American Navy off Guadalcanal and the two forces met on 26 October 1942 in the Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands. Barton was still escorting Hornet, which was also joined by the carrier USS Enterprise (CV-6). During the massive battle that followed, Barton provided anti-aircraft cover for Hornet but the carrier was hit repeatedly by Japanese aircraft and began to sink. Barton rescued 250 of Hornet’s crew before the carrier went down. Although the battle was basically a draw (with two Japanese carriers severely damaged for the loss of Hornet), this was only the beginning of Japan’s naval assault on Guadalcanal.

After making a daring rescue of 17 American crewmen and passengers that were on board a C-47 aircraft that crashed on a reef near Guadalcanal, Barton returned to Noumea and was assigned to Rear Admiral Richmond K. Turner’s Task Force 67. The task force rendezvoused with Rear Admiral Daniel J. Callaghan’s Task Force 67.4 just east of Guadalcanal (near San Cristobal Island) on the morning of 11 November 1942. The two admirals received intelligence reports that a major Japanese naval task force was headed for Guadalcanal. At the same time, a large number of American troop and cargo ships were going to be unloading their badly needed cargo onto the beaches of Guadalcanal. The American warships had to protect the cargo ships from the oncoming Japanese task force.

By 0718 on the morning of 12 November 1942, the cruiser USS Helena (CL-50) and the destroyer Shaw (DD-373) joined Barton in firing on Japanese batteries on land that were firing on the American transports. The counter-battery fire coming from the American warships was extremely accurate and silenced the Japanese guns. This allowed the American transports to continue unloading their troops and cargo without interruption. During the daylight hours, Japanese aircraft tried to attack the cargo ships, but accurate anti-aircraft fire destroyed many enemy warplanes without the loss of any cargo ships.

Then came nighttime. Knowing that the Japanese were approaching, Rear Admiral Turner moved the transports away from the beach and ordered Rear Admiral Callaghan to meet the oncoming Japanese warships. Rear Admiral Turner concluded that this was the only way to stop the Japanese. Even if Callaghan’s force was annihilated, the attack would prevent the Japanese from bombarding Henderson Field and it would inflict so much damage on the enemy that it would allow Turner to continue unloading his merchant ships onto Guadalcanal.

At 1815 on the evening of 12 November, Rear Admiral Turner’s troop transports and cargo ships steamed eastward, away from Guadalcanal. At the same time, Rear Admiral Callaghan’s task force headed north to intercept the Japanese. The ships were deployed in a single column, with four destroyers leading five cruisers followed by another four destroyers, with Barton being among those last four ships. At 0124 on the morning of 13 November 1942, American radar on board the lead ships located the enemy. It was a Japanese task force under the command of Rear Admiral Hiroaki Abe and it consisted of two battleships, one light cruiser, and 14 destroyers.

When the two columns of warships finally slammed into each other, a melee ensued. Some of the ships were only 1,000 yards from each other when the firing began. As the battle continued, the ships from both sides got mixed up, making shooting even more difficult. Barton opened fire with her forward 5-inch guns as soon as she saw the enemy searchlights illuminating the American ships ahead of her. Barton’s forward guns were aimed to port and fired roughly 60 rounds, while her two aft guns fired about 10 rounds each. Barton then altered course to port, moving closer to the enemy column of warships, and launched five torpedoes at the Japanese. Barton’s guns fired for about seven more minutes before the ship had to stop to avoid colliding with the ship in front of it, possibly the destroyer USS Aaron Ward (DD-433). But in stopping, Barton became a perfect target for the Japanese destroyers. After a few seconds, the Japanese destroyer Amatsukaze, which was only 3,000 yards away, fired a torpedo that hit the forward part of Barton. A few seconds later, a second torpedo hit Barton in her forward engine room. There were two tremendous explosions from these torpedo hits that literally broke the ship in half. USS Fletcher (DD-445) which was bringing up the rear of the American column, saw Barton explode at 0156. Lookouts on board Fletcher later stated that Barton “simply disappeared in fragments.”

Ironically, the flames from what was left of Barton and her burning fuel oil illuminated the area, enabling Fletcher’s lookouts to see the wake of a torpedo that was headed straight for her. Fletcher altered course to avoid the torpedo, but in doing so the destroyer moved straight through a group of Barton’s survivors that were struggling in the water. Only 42 of Barton’s crew were later rescued by the cruiser USS Portland (CA-33), as well as by some landing craft from Guadalcanal.

Among the dead was the ship’s commanding officer, Lieutenant Commander Douglas H. Fox. As a tribute to this fine officer, a destroyer, USS Douglas H. Fox (DD-772), was named after him. But the enormous sacrifice made by the US Navy that night in terms of men and warships was not in vain. The Japanese task force not only suffered huge losses, but it was prevented from bombarding and destroying Henderson Field. It was a major victory against terrible odds and it enabled the Marines to hold onto Guadalcanal.

As for Barton, she earned four battle stars for the roughly six months she was in service. In 1992, an expedition that was examining the wrecks off Guadalcanal located part of Barton. She lies in more than 2,000 feet of water southeast of Savo Island. All that was found was the first 100 feet or so of her bow, resting on its port side with both forward five-inch guns still facing port. The ship’s stern section should be nearby, but was never found.


Barton DD- 599 - History

The first Barton (DD 599) was laid down on 20 May 1941 at Quincy, Mass., by the Bethlehem Steel Co. launched on 31 January 1942 sponsored by Miss Barbara Dean Barton, granddaughter of Rear Admiral Barton and commissioned at the Boston Navy Yard on 29 May 1942, Lt. Comdr. Douglas H. Fox in command.

Barton
arrived at Newport, R.I., on 18 June 1942 and reported for duty with the Atlantic Fleet. Following a brief shakedown in Casco Bay, Maine, the new destroyer operated locally through late July escorting Salinas (AO 19) to Portland, Maine, on 29 June (1942) and the new battleship Massachusetts (BB 59) to Hampton Roads. On 2 August (1942) Barton reported to the Commander, Eastern Sea Frontier, for temporary duty. She carried out antisubmarine patrols between Point Lookout and Cape Henry from 4 to 8 August (1942), before escorting New York (BB 34) to New York City. Barton then sailed to Boston and accompanied Savannah (CL 43) to Norfolk.

Convoying Massachusetts to Casco Bay, in company with O'Bannon (DD 450) and Nicholas (DD 449), Barton then rendezvoused with Nicholas Meade (DD 602), and Washington (BB 55) at New York, and sailed for the Pacific on 23 August (1942). Transiting the Panama Canal at the end of August, Barton steamed with Task Group (TG) 2.12 to the Tonga Islands, arriving at Tongatabu on 12 September (1942). Later, she moved on to Noumea, New Caledonia.

On 2 October (1942), Barton stood out of Noumea with Task Force (TF) 17, formed around Hornet (CV 8) and which also included two heavy cruisers, two light cruisers, and four other destroyers. A large concentration of enemy shipping in the Shortland Islands threatened American operations on Guadalcanal in the Solomons and prompted the dispatch of TF 17 on a northward sweep. Three days later, on 5 October (1942), Hornet's air group, although plagued by bad weather, managed to damage two Japanese destroyers and to sink a transport and claimed to have damaged three other ships. It also scored hits on runways and buildings at the airstrip at Kieta.

Within a short time, the Guadalcanal campaign entered a new phase. On 13 October (1942), the Japanese, in an effort to take Henderson Field, the valuable airstrip on Guadalcanal, began mounting daily air raids and nightly bombardments by surface warships. With the situation critical, the Japanese renewed their land campaign to take the airstrip on 23 October (1942).

Barton
was at sea with the task forces formed around Hornet and Enterprise (CV 6) when the Japanese engaged these forces on 26 October (1942) in the Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands. Barton screened Hornet during the attacks by Japanese planes that stopped that carrier dead in the water and ultimately forced her abandonment. Exhibiting "superb judgment and expert seamanship," Lt. Comdr. Fox maneuvered Barton expertly and his ship rescued 250 men from the stricken Hornet.

A few days after the battle, Barton performed an unusual rescue operation. An Army C 47 had taken off from Henderson Field at 1930 on 20 October during an intense enemy artillery bombardment. Straying off course and becoming lost while attempting to reach New Caledonia or the New Hebrides, the plane ditched on a reef when it's fuel ran out. Eight days later an Army plane discovered the wreck, and an Australian bomber dropped blankets, food, and cigarettes to the survivors. Three Navy PBY's arrived the following day and landed close to the reef in a rough sea.

The PBYs took on board the six crew members and 19 passengers from rubber rafts, but found that the sea state prevented them from taking off, and they radioed for help. Barton reached the scene on 30 October (1942) and, despite the "extreme darkness and adverse conditions," maneuvered carefully in the vicinity of the dangerous reefs. Despite the imminent threat of enemy submarines, Barton rescued the stranded men without incident. The last of the PBYs to be unloaded collided with the destroyer and sank while being brought alongside. Some of it's crew spent two and a half hours in the water before Barton located them in the darkness and brought them on board. The ship reached Noumea on 31 October (1942), and put her passengers safely ashore.

Barton
remained at Noumea until 8 November (1942), when she sailed for Guadalcanal as one of the escorts for four transports of TF 67 under Rear Admiral Richmond K. Turner. She rendezvoused with Rear Admiral Daniel J. Callaghan's TG 67.4 near the eastern end of San Cristobal Island on the morning of the 11th. Intelligence indicated that a major Japanese push was underway against Guadalcanal, and troops and equipment had to be landed by 12 November (1942) to meet the expected thrust.

At 0540 on 12 November (1942), the transports of TG 67.1 anchored off Kukum Beach, Guadalcanal, while two cargo ships anchored off Lunga Point. Meanwhile, the cruisers and destroyers deployed in two protective semicircles. At 0718, enemy 6 inch shore batteries opened fire on the anchored transports, drawing counterbattery fire from Helena (CL 50) at 0728 and from Shaw (DD 373) and Barton at 0743. The fire from these ships joined that of marine artillery to put the enemy guns out of action. Meanwhile, the disembarkation and unloading from the transports and cargo vessels continued.

That afternoon, Japanese planes swept in to attack the transports. Accurate and heavy antiaircraft fire from the screening ships met them, however, and destroyed all but one of the 21 attacking "Betties." That evening, knowing of the approach of the enemy, Rear Admiral Turner cleared out his transports, leaving the covering force under Rear Admiral Callaghan to oppose the expected Japanese night bombardment.

In deciding to send TG 67.4 northward to attack the enemy force--estimated to comprise at least two battleships and two to four heavy cruisers, with a proportionate number of destroyers--Rear Admiral Turner had concluded that this was the only way the enemy could be stopped. Even if the force was sacrificed entirely, their sacrifice would probably prevent the bombardment of the airfield and inflict enough damage on the enemy to thwart his attempt to land reinforcements.

At 1815 on the 12th, Rear Admiral Turner's transports and cargo ship steamed eastward out of Savo Sound. Meanwhile, TG 67.4 passed through Sealark Channel, turned northward through Indispensable Strait, and deployed in "Battle Disposition Baker One," a column of ships with four destroyers leading five cruisers followed by another four more destroyers-- Barton among them. Task Group 67.4 entered Lengo Channel at midnight. The sky was overcast, the moon had set, and the night was utterly dark.

At 0124, near Lunga Point, radar picked up ships to the northwest--Japan's "Volunteer Attack Force" under Rear Admiral Hiroaki Abe, consisting of two battleships, a light cruiser, and 14 destroyers. Shortly thereafter, the word of "enemy forces in the immediate vicinity" was passed on board Barton . The action that ensued soon became a wild melee ranges varied from 1,000 to 8,000 yards, with most firing being done at 5,000 yards.

At about 0145 Lt.(j.g.) Harlowe M. White,, USNR, observed the leading ships of the American column opening fire to port. Admiral Abe was not aware of the Americans until the Japanese destroyer Yudachi sighted Callaghan's warships at 0142. Task Group 67.4's opening fire took the enemy by surprise with his forces in disarray and with bombardment shells, rather than armor piercing ammunition, ready.

Barton
opened fire with her forward 5 inch guns soon after seeing enemy searchlights illuminate American ships ahead of her. Her forward guns trained to port and fired about 60 rounds, while the after guns opened fire soon thereafter, hurling about 10 rounds from each gun before they could no longer bear upon the enemy.

Barton
altered course to port, moving closer to the enemy column, and launched one torpedo in the direction of the 1eading Japanese ship, then followed it with four more a few seconds later. The destroyer's 5 inch battery delivered about seven more minutes of fire before Barton had to stop her engines to avoid a collision with an unidentified ship--possibly Aaron Ward (DD 433)--just ahead of her. A few seconds later a torpedo from the Japanese destroyer Amatsukaze, one of eight fired at 3,000 yards range, tore into Barton's forward fireroom. A few seconds later, a second torpedo struck her forward engine room. The two "Long Lances" broke the ship in half. Fletcher (DD 445), bringing up the rear of the American formation, observed Barton explode at 0156. To Fletcher's lookouts Barton "simply disappeared in fragments."

Fletcher spotted the wake of a torpedo by the flames from the disintegrating Barton, altered course to avoid the "Long Lance" and escaped damage but she passed through Barton's struggling survivors, injuring several. Forty two survivors were later rescued by Portland (CA 33) and by landing craft from Guadalcanal. Among the dead was the ship's commanding officer, Lt. Comdr. Fox, whose distinguished command of Barton was recognized in the naming of the destroyer Douglas H. Fox (DD 772) in his honor.

By their sacrifice, Barton and her sailors had helped to turn back the Japanese attempt to pound Henderson Field in a desperately fought action. The valor of the men of TG 67.4 won a victory against heavy odds and enabled the American marines to hold Guadalcanal.

Barton (DD-599) earned four battle stars for her World War II service.


Barton DD- 599 - History

From: DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL FIGHTING SHIPS, Vol. I, p. 101.

Born in Philadelphia 7 April 1853, John Kennedy Barton graduated from the Academy in 1873. He served as Engineer-in-Chief and Chief of the Bureau of Steam Engineering with the rank of Rear Admiral. He retired 23 December 1908. Rear Admiral Barton died in Philadelphia 23 December 1921.

(DD-599: dp. 1620 l. 347'9", b. 36'1": dr. 17'4", s. 36 k. cpl. 276 a. 5 5", 10 21" TT. cl. Benson )

The first Barton (DD-599) was launched 31 January 1942 by Bethlehem Steel Co., Quincy, Mass. sponsored by Miss Barbara Dean Barton, granddaughter of Admiral Barton and commissioned 29 May 1842, Lieutenant Commander D. H. Fox in command.

Barton departed the east coast 23 August 1942 and steamed to the Pacific, arriving at Tongatabu, Tonga Islands, 14 September 1942. During October she participated in the Buin-Faisi-Tonolai raid (5 October) and the Battle of Santa Cruz (26 October). On 29 October she successfully rescued 17 survivors of two downed air transports near Fabre Island.

Against great odds on 13 November Barton, in company with Rear Admiral D. J. Callaghan's landing sup port group, took part in the Naval Battle of Guadalcanal. Barton commenced firing on the Japanese ships at approximately 0148. After launching four torpedoes she had to come to an emergency stop to avoid a collision. While she was practically dead in the water, two enemy torpedoes found their mark. The first torpedo struck her forward fireroom and, a few seconds later, a second torpedo struck her forward engine-room. Within seconds, Barton broke in two and sank, carrying with her an estimated 80 percent of her valiant crew. Forty-two survivors were rescued by Portland (CA-33) and Higgins boats from Guadalcanal.

Barton received four battle stars for her service during October and November 1942.


DD-599 Barton

The first Barton (DD-599) was launched 31 January 1942 by Bethlehem Steel Co., Quincy, Mass. sponsored by Miss Barbara Dean Barton, granddaughter of Admiral Barton and commissioned 29 May 1842, Lieutenant Commander D. H. Fox in command.

Barton departed the east coast 23 August 1942 and steamed to the Pacific, arriving at Tongatabu, Tonga Islands, 14 September 1942. During October she participated in the Buin-Faisi-Tonolai raid (5 October) and the Battle of Santa Cruz (26 October). On 29 October she successfully rescued 17 survivors of two downed air transports near Fabre Island.

Against great odds on 13 November Barton, in company with Rear Admiral D. J. Callaghan's landing sup port group, took part in the Naval Battle of Guadalcanal. Barton commenced firing on the Japanese ships at approximately 0148. After launching four torpedoes she had to come to an emergency stop to avoid a collision. While she was practically dead in the water, two enemy torpedoes found their mark. The first torpedo struck her forward fireroom and, a few seconds later, a second torpedo struck her forward engine-room. Within seconds, Barton broke in two and sank, carrying with her an estimated 80 percent of her valiant crew. Forty-two survivors were rescued by Portland (CA-33) and Higgins boats from Guadalcanal.

Barton received four battle stars for her service during October and November 1942.


Základní výzbroj tvořilo pět 127mm kanónů (z nich kanóny 1, 2 aم byly v jednodělových věžích, zatímco kanóny 3 aل byly v nekrytých postaveních), šest 12,7mm kulometů a dva pětihlavňové 533mm torpédomety. Pohonný systém tvořily čtyři kotle Babcock & Wilcox a dvě turbíny Westinghouse. Lodní šrouby byly dva. Dosah byl 6500 námořních mil při 12 uzlech. Nejvyšší rychlost dosahovala 35 uzlů.

V srpnu 1942 Barton, společně s torpédoborci USS Nicholas a USS Meade, doprovázel bitevní loď USS Washington na její plavbě z New Yorku skrze Panamský průplav na pacifické válčiště. Poté byl torpédoborec přidělen 2. eskadře torpédoborců (Morris, Anderson, Hughes, Mustin a Russell), doprovázející v rámci svazu TF 17 letadlovou loď USS Hornet. Bojoval i v říjnu 1942 v bitvě u ostrovů Santa Cruz, ve které byl Hornet potopen.

Barton poté operoval v oblasti Šalomounových ostrovů, kde byl 13. listopadu 1942 potopen v námořní bitvě u Guadalcanalu. Jeho potopení bylo důsledkem dvou zásahů japonských 610mm torpéd z torpédoborce Amacukaze. Zachránilo se pouze 43 mužů, které z moře vylovil těžký křižník USS Portland. Vrak lodi dodnes leží na dně průlivu se železným dnem. Ώ]


Barton được đặt lườn tại xưởng tàu Fore River Shipyard của hãng Bethlehem Steel Corporation ở Quincy, Massachusetts vào ngày 20 tháng 5 năm 1941. Nó được hạ thủy vào ngày 31 tháng 1 năm 1942 được đỡ đầu bởi cô Barbara Dean Barton, cháu nội Đô đốc Barton, và được cho nhập biên chế vào ngày 29 tháng 5 năm 1942 dưới quyền chỉ huy của Hạm trưởng, Thiếu tá Hải quân D. H. Fox.

Barton rời vùng bờ Đông Hoa Kỳ vào ngày 23 tháng 8 năm 1942 để đi sang khu vực Thái Bình Dương, đi đến Tongatapu thuộc quần đảo Tonga vào ngày 14 tháng 9. Trong tháng 10, nó tham gia cuộc bắn phá Buin-Faisi-Tonolai vào ngày 5 tháng 10 cùng Trận chiến quần đảo Santa Cruz vào ngày 26 tháng 10, nơi nó bắn rơi bảy máy bay đối phương. Vào ngày 29 tháng 10, nó cứu vớt 17 người sống sót thuộc hai chiếc máy bay vận tải bị bắn rơi gần đảo Fabre.

Đi đến ngoài khơi Guadalcanal vào ngày 12 tháng 11, nó hộ tống thành công một đoàn tàu vận tải tiếp liệu cho hòn đảo này, rồi được lệnh tham gia lực lượng dưới quyền Chuẩn đô đốc Daniel J. Callaghan, bao gồm năm tàu tuần dương và bảy tàu khu trục khác để đẩy lùi một lực lượng tàu chiến Nhật Bản, bị máy bay trinh sát Đồng Minh phát hiện đang di chuyển dọc xuống vùng biển mệnh danh "Cái Khe" về phía Guadalcanal. Nằm ở vị trí thứ 11 trong đội hình lực lượng Hoa Kỳ trước khi hoàng hôn, thủy thủ đoàn của nó bước vào trực chiến, chờ đợi lực lượng Nhật Bản được dự đoán sẽ đụng độ khoảng nữa đêm.

Khi bóng đêm bao phủ vùng biển mệnh danh eo biểm Đáy Sắt, nhiều cơn mưa giông và mưa rào nhiệt đới bắt đầu kéo qua suốt khu vực, giới hạn tầm nhìn cho cả hai phía Hoa Kỳ và Nhật Bản khi họ di chuyển hướng vào nhau. Dù sao nhiều tàu chiến Hoa Kỳ đã được trang bị các hệ thống radar tầm xa, vốn cho phép họ bắt đầu phát hiện ra các tàu chiến Nhật Bản đang tiến đến vào khoảng 00 giờ 30 phút. Bao gồm hai thiết giáp hạm, một tàu tuần dương và chín tàu khu trục, hạm đội Nhật Bản vòng qua bờ biển Tây Bắc của đảo Savo và đi vào eo biển Đáy Sắt lúc khoảng 01 giờ 10 phút, nhắm hướng đến sân bay Henderson trên đảo Guadalcanal, căn cứ không lực Đồng Minh mà họ được lệnh phá hủy. Băng qua một cơn mưa giông nặng hạt, các tàu chiến Nhật hoàn toàn không biết đến sự hiện diện của lực lượng Hoa Kỳ ngay phía trước cơn mưa rào cũng ngăn trở phía Hoa Kỳ trông thấy bằng mắt đối thủ trong hơn một giờ kể từ khi bắt được tín hiệu radar đầu tiên.

Lúc khoảng 01 giờ 30 phút, cả hai phía đối địch đều nhìn thấy nhau khi các tàu chiến Nhật xuất hiện từ một cơn mưa giông chỉ cách đội hình tàu chiến Hoa Kỳ 3.000 yd (2.740 m). Cho dù phía Hoa Kỳ đi thẳng vào giữa lực lượng Nhật Bản, không bên nào nổ súng trong gần mười phút khi họ băng ngang lẫn nhau. Các tàu chiến Nhật Bản vây quanh đội hình hàng chiến trận Mỹ khi chúng xuất hiện từ bóng đêm ở ba nhóm khác nhau. Đứng ở vị trí áp cuối của hàng tàu khu trục, Barton bắt đầu xoay các khẩu pháo và ống phóng ngư lôi của nó nhắm vào nhiều tàu chiến Nhật ở gần nhất và chờ đợi mệnh lệnh khai hỏa từ soái hạm. Lúc 01 giờ 48 phút, mệnh lệnh không còn cần thiết khi tàu khu trục Nhật Akatsuki bật đèn pha tìm kiếm chiếu thẳng vào tàu tuần dương hạng nhẹ Atlanta, khiến cả hai phía bắt đầu nổ súng vào nhau, bắt đầu trận Hải chiến Guadalcanal thứ nhất.

Giờ đây hoàn toàn bị vây quanh bởi hàng chiến trận Nhật Bản, Barton và tàu khu trục USS Monssen (DD-436) di chuyển về phía đuôi thoát sang hướng Tây Bắc, thẳng vào nhóm tàu chiến chủ yếu Nhật Bản trong khi bắn trực diện vào các tàu khu trục đối phương lân cận, đồng thời phải cơ động quyết liệt để né tránh cả tàu bạn lẫn tàu đối phương trong một trận chiến lộn xộn. Nó vừa bắn một loạt ngư lôi nhắm vào thiết giáp hạm Hiei khi chiếc tàu tuần dương hạng nhẹ USS Helena (CL-50) bất ngờ xuất hiện từ bóng đêm và cắt thẳng vào mũi tàu của Barton. Thực hiện một cú dừng khẩn cấp để tránh va chạm với Helena, Barton bị chết đứng giữa biển trong lúc thủy thủ phòng máy đang nỗ lực nối lại hộp số vào động cơ để tiếp tục di chuyển. Tuy nhiên, trước khi nó có thể di chuyển trở lại, hai quả ngư lôi Long Lance phóng từ tàu khu trục Amatsukaze đã đánh trúng vào phần giữa của Barton, một trúng vào phòng nồi hơi và một trúng phòng động cơ. Các vụ nổ dữ dội đã khiến Barton bị vỡ làm đôi và cả hai phần chìm nhanh chóng chỉ trong vòng vài phút sau khi trúng quả ngư lôi thứ nhất, mang theo nó 164 người, gồm 13 sĩ quan và 151 thủy thủ. Tàu tuần dương hạng nặng USS Portland (CA-33) cứu vớt được 42 người sống sót, và thêm 26 người khác được các xuồng đổ bộ Higgins boat từ Guadalcanal cứu sống.

Phần phía mũi xác tàu đắm của Barton được Robert Ballard khám khá vào năm 1992 khi chỉ có mũi tàu và cấu trúc thượng tầng phía trước phòng nồi hơi được tìm thấy nguyên vẹn. Cho đến nay phần đuôi của Barton vẫn chưa được tìm thấy.

Barton được tặng thưởng bốn Ngôi sao Chiến trận do thành tích phục vụ trong Thế Chiến II.


Základní výzbroj tvořilo pět 127mm kanónů (z nich kanóny 1, 2 aم byly v jednodělových věžích, zatímco kanóny 3 aل byly v nekrytých postaveních), šest 12,7mm kulometů a dva pětihlavňové 533mm torpédomety. Pohonný systém tvořily čtyři kotle Babcock & Wilcox a dvě turbíny Westinghouse. Lodní šrouby byly dva. Dosah byl 6500 námořních mil při 12 uzlech. Nejvyšší rychlost dosahovala 35 uzlů.

V srpnu 1942 Barton, společně s torpédoborci USS Nicholas a USS Meade, doprovázel bitevní loď USS Washington na její plavbě z New Yorku skrze Panamský průplav na pacifické válčiště. Poté byl torpédoborec přidělen 2. eskadře torpédoborců (Morris, Anderson, Hughes, Mustin a Russell), doprovázející v rámci svazu TF 17 letadlovou loď USS Hornet. Bojoval i v říjnu 1942 v bitvě u ostrovů Santa Cruz, ve které byl Hornet potopen.

Barton poté operoval v oblasti Šalomounových ostrovů, kde byl 13. listopadu 1942 potopen v námořní bitvě u Guadalcanalu. Jeho potopení bylo důsledkem dvou zásahů japonských 610mm torpéd z torpédoborce Amacukaze. Zachránilo se pouze 43 mužů, které z moře vylovil těžký křižník USS Portland. Vrak lodi dodnes leží na dně průlivu se železným dnem. Ώ]


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