Bivin DE-536 - History

Bivin DE-536 - History

Bivin

Born in Greenville, Ky., 23 November 1921, Vernard Eugene Bivin enlisted in the Navy in 1940. Killed in action on board Salt Lake City (CA-25) 12 October 1942, during the Battle of Cape Esperance, Seaman First Class Bivin received a posthumous Navy Cross.

(DE-536: dp. 1350; 1. 306'; b. 36'8"; dr. 13'4"; s. 24 k.;
cpl. 186; a. 2 5"; cl. John C. Butler)

Bivin (DE-536) was launched 7 December 1943 by Boston Navy Yard; sponsored by Mrs. Ella Florence Bivin, mother of Seaman Bivin; and commissioned 31 October 1944, Lieutenant Commander M. Kelly in command.

Assigned to the Pacific Fleet, Bivin departed Boston I February 1945 and arrived at Seeadler Harbor, Manus, Admiralty Islands, 20 March. After escorting a convoy from Kossol Roads, Palau Islands, to Leyte during late March and early April, she patrolled and escorted convoys in the Philippines. Between late August and early November she escorted convoys from the Philippines to Okinawa, patrolled in the Philippines, and made a trip to Hong Kong. Returning to San Pedro, Calif., 17 December 1945 she reported to the 19th Fleet. On 15 January 1947 she went out of commission in reserve.


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USS Bivin DE-536 Guestbook Forum


What Bivin family records will you find?

There are 2,000 census records available for the last name Bivin. Like a window into their day-to-day life, Bivin census records can tell you where and how your ancestors worked, their level of education, veteran status, and more.

There are 193 immigration records available for the last name Bivin. Passenger lists are your ticket to knowing when your ancestors arrived in the USA, and how they made the journey - from the ship name to ports of arrival and departure.

There are 540 military records available for the last name Bivin. For the veterans among your Bivin ancestors, military collections provide insights into where and when they served, and even physical descriptions.

There are 2,000 census records available for the last name Bivin. Like a window into their day-to-day life, Bivin census records can tell you where and how your ancestors worked, their level of education, veteran status, and more.

There are 193 immigration records available for the last name Bivin. Passenger lists are your ticket to knowing when your ancestors arrived in the USA, and how they made the journey - from the ship name to ports of arrival and departure.

There are 540 military records available for the last name Bivin. For the veterans among your Bivin ancestors, military collections provide insights into where and when they served, and even physical descriptions.


You've only scratched the surface of Bivins family history.

Between 1944 and 2004, in the United States, Bivins life expectancy was at its lowest point in 1944, and highest in 1964. The average life expectancy for Bivins in 1944 was 22, and 71 in 2004.

An unusually short lifespan might indicate that your Bivins ancestors lived in harsh conditions. A short lifespan might also indicate health problems that were once prevalent in your family. The SSDI is a searchable database of more than 70 million names. You can find birthdates, death dates, addresses and more.


Contents

The standard armament for the class was two 5 in (127 mm) dual purpose guns, four 40 mm and ten 20 mm anti-aircraft guns, and three 21 inch (533 mm) torpedo tubes. It also carried two depth charge racks, eight K-gun depth charge projectors and one hedgehog projector as secondary weapons. The ships had a maximum speed of 24 kn (28 mph 44 km/h).

The most notable ship of this class was Samuel B. Roberts, which gained fame during the Battle of Leyte Gulf, where she, along with several other ships, engaged a number of cruisers and battleships of the Imperial Japanese Navy in a torpedo attack, where she was sunk after taking several hits. [2] During this action, Samuel B. Roberts achieved a speed of 28.7 kn (33.0 mph 53.2 km/h) for over an hour by running her engines at 660 psi (46 bar). [3] She is known in naval lore as "the destroyer escort that fought like a battleship". The other two ships of this class lost were USS Shelton and USS Eversole.

Also notable was Tabberer for which Captain Henry Lee Plage earned the Legion of Merit, while the entire crew earned the Navy's Unit Commendation Ribbon for taking the initiative to rescue other ships after a disastrous storm. In December 1944, the ship lost her mast and radio antennas riding out Typhoon Cobra, which killed 790 sailors (more than were lost at the battles of Midway and Coral Sea combined). Though damaged and unable to radio for help, she was first on the scene to recover 55 of only 93 total rescued from three destroyers which capsized in the heavy seas.

A floating history museum of the destroyer escorts resides in Albany, New York. [4] USS Slater (a related Cannon-class destroyer escort) is docked during temperate months on the Hudson River in Albany, New York. An Edsall-class destroyer escort, USS Stewart, is also on display as a museum ship in Galveston, Texas.


Jim Bivin Obituary

Appeared in The Chieftain on November 9, 1982 / Obituaries / Jim Bivin

Former Phils Hurler, Pueblo Dodgers pilot James N. Bivin dies

James N. Bivin, a former major league baseball player and long-time minor league player, died after a brief illness Sunday at Parkview Episcopal Hospital.

Gentleman Jim Bivin, as he was known, was born on Dec. 11, 1909, in Jackson, Miss. He had been recovering from a mild heart attach which occurred about a month ago. He suffered another apparent heart attack on Sunday.

Bivin played only one year in the major leagues, as a pitcher for the Philadelphia Phillies. However, that season was an eventful year for him.

Bivin, a righthander, was the last pitcher to face Babe Ruth, before the Boston Braves released Ruth on June 2 of that year. Bivin also pitched in the first night game in baseball history.

Bivin's record for 1935 ranked him third in the league in the number of games pitched. He started 14 games, pitched in 161.2 innings, had a won-loss record of 2-9 with one save and an earned run average of 5.79. The Phillies finished seventh that year with a 64-89 record under manager Jimmy Wilson.

Bivin then became a manager, spending 23 years in the minor leagues, including the 1951 season as pilot of the Pueblo Dodgers.

He won three straight Cotton States League pennants with the Greenwood Dodgers in the late 1940s before moving up to Danville, Ill., where his club finished second in the Three-I League in 1950.

Bivin's 1951 Dodgers had an up and down season. Bivin knew the key to the season was pitching. And early in the year, with fresh pitching and standout Elroy Face winning regularly, the Dodgers climbed into a tie for the lead.

As the season grew-on, however, the pitching became a problem and the Dodgers limped home third with a 74-89 record.

Adrian Comer Funeral Home is in charge of funeral arrangements.

On May 24, 1935, Jim Bivin pitched in the Phillies 2-1 loss to the Reds in the first Major League game ever played under lights at Cincinnati's Crosley Field.

On May 30, 1935, Jim Bivin was the last Major League pitcher to face Babe Ruth who grounded out to Dolph Camilli in the first inning and never played again.

Did you know that Jim Bivin pitched for the 2nd Marine Division baseball team in the Marine Corps Championships with hurlers Cal Dorsett and Bill Connelly and when Bivin returned home from World War II in late 1945, he had a Purple Heart and two Bronze Stars?


Ships built at Boston Navy Yard

  • 1814: USS Independence (90-gun ship of the line) War of 1812 Mexican–American War
  • 1825: USS Boston (18-gun sloop of war) Mexican–American War
  • 1827: USS Warren (20-gun sloop of war) Mexican–American War
  • 1827: USS Falmouth (24-gun sloop of war) Mexican–American War
  • 1837: USS Cyane (22-gun sloop of war) Mexican–American War American Civil War
  • 1839: USS Marion (16-gun sloop of war) American Civil War
  • 1842: USS Cumberland (50-gun frigate) Mexican–American War Battle of Hampton Roads
  • 1844: USS Plymouth (22-gun sloop of war) Perry Expedition
  • 1848: USS Vermont (74-gun ship of the line) American Civil War
  • 1858: USS Hartford (22-gun sloop of war) Battle of Forts Jackson and St. Philip Battle of Mobile Bay
  • 1859: USS Narragansett (5-gun sloop of war) American Civil War
  • 1861: USS Wachusett (10-gun sloop of war) Peninsula Campaign Bahia incident
  • 1861: USS Housatonic (11-gun sloop of war) Sinking of USS Housatonic
  • 1861: USS Maratanza (side-wheel steam gunboat) Peninsula Campaign First Battle of Fort Fisher Second Battle of Fort Fisher
  • 1862: USS Canandaigua (6-gun sloop of war) American Civil War
  • 1862: USS Tioga (side-wheel steam gunboat) American Civil War
  • 1862: USS Genesee (side-wheel steam gunboat) American Civil War
  • 1863: USS Monadnock (monitor) First Battle of Fort Fisher Second Battle of Fort Fisher
  • 1863: USS Pequot (gunboat) First Battle of Fort Fisher Second Battle of Fort Fisher
  • 1863: USS Saco (gunboat) American Civil War
  • 1863: USS Winooski (side-wheel steam gunboat)
  • 1864: USS Ammonoosuc (frigate)
  • 1865: USS Guerriere (sloop of war)
  • 1866: USS Worcester (sloop of war)
  • 1867: USS Nantasket (sloop of war)
  • 1868: USS Alaska (sloop of war) Battle of Ganghwa
  • 1876: USS Vandalia (sloop of war) 1889 Apia cyclone
  • 1916: USS Bridge (Combat stores ship) World War I World War II
  • 1919: USS Brazos (Fleet oiler) World War II
  • 1920: USS Neches (Fleet oiler) World War II
  • 1921: USS Pecos (Fleet oiler) World War II
  • 1934: USS MacDonough (DD-351) (Farragut-class destroyer) Attack on Pearl Harbor Battle of Savo Island Battle of the Philippine Sea Battle of Leyte Gulf
  • 1935: USS Monaghan (DD-354) (Farragut-class destroyer) Attack on Pearl Harbor Battle of the Coral Sea Battle of Midway Battle of the Komandorski Islands Battle of the Philippine Sea
  • 1935: USS Case (DD-370) (Mahan-class destroyer) Attack on Pearl Harbor Battle of the Philippine Sea
  • 1935: USS Conyngham (DD-371) (Mahan-class destroyer) Attack on Pearl Harbor Battle of Midway Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands Operation Crossroads
  • 1936: USS Mugford (DD-389) (Benham-class destroyer) Attack on Pearl Harbor
  • 1936: USS Ralph Talbot (DD-390) (Benham-class destroyer) Attack on Pearl Harbor Battle of Savo Island Battle of Kolombangara Battle off Cape Engaño Operation Crossroads
  • 1938: USS Mayrant (DD-402) (Benham-class destroyer) Naval Battle of Casablanca Operation Crossroads
  • 1938: USS Trippe (DD-403) (Benham-class destroyer) Allied invasion of Sicily Invasion of Salerno Operation Crossroads
  • 1939: USS O'Brien (DD-415) (Sims-class destroyer) Guadalcanal Campaign
  • 1939: USS Walke (DD-416) (Sims-class destroyer) Naval Battle of Guadalcanal
  • 1939: USS Madison (DD-425) (Benson-class destroyer) Battle of the Atlantic Operation Dragoon
  • 1939: USS Lansdale (DD-426) (Benson-class destroyer) Battle of the Atlantic
  • 1940: USS Gwin (DD-433) (Gleaves-class destroyer) Doolittle Raid Battle of Midway Naval Battle of Guadalcanal Battle of Kolombangara
  • 1940: USS Meredith (DD-434) (Gleaves-class destroyer) Doolittle Raid
  • 1940: USS Wilkes (DD-441) (Gleaves-class destroyer) Naval Battle of Casablanca
  • 1940: USS Nicholson (DD-442) (Gleaves-class destroyer) invasion of Salerno Battle for Leyte Gulf
  • 1941: USS Forrest (DD-461) (Gleaves-class destroyer) Operation Torch Normandy invasion Operation Dragoon Battle of Okinawa
  • 1941: USS Fitch (DD-462) (Gleaves-class destroyer) Operation Torch Normandy invasion Operation Dragoon
  • 1941: USS Cowie (DD-632) (Gleaves-class destroyer) Operation Torch Allied invasion of Sicily
  • 1941: USS Knight (DD-633) (Gleaves-class destroyer) Operation Torch Allied invasion of Sicily Allied invasion of Italy
  • 1941: USS Doran (DD-634) (Gleaves-class destroyer) Operation Torch Allied invasion of Sicily
  • 1941: USS Earle (DD-635) (Gleaves-class destroyer) Allied invasion of Sicily
  • 1942: USS Guest (DD-472) (Fletcher-class destroyer) Battle of the Philippine Sea Battle of Iwo Jima Battle of Okinawa
  • 1942: USS Bennett (DD-473) (Fletcher-class destroyer) Battle of Iwo Jima Battle of Okinawa
  • 1942: USS Fullam (DD-474) (Fletcher-class destroyer) Battle of the Philippine Sea Battle of Iwo Jima Battle of Okinawa
  • 1942: USS Hudson (DD-475) (Fletcher-class destroyer) Battle of the Philippine Sea Battle of Iwo Jima Battle of Okinawa
  • 1942: USS Hutchins (DD-476) (Fletcher-class destroyer) Battle of Surigao Strait Battle of Iwo Jima Battle of Okinawa
  • 1942: USS Charrette (DD-581) (Fletcher-class destroyer) Battle of the Philippine Sea Battle for Leyte Gulf
  • 1942: USS Conner (DD-582) (Fletcher-class destroyer) Battle of the Philippine Sea Battle for Leyte Gulf
  • 1942: USS Hall (DD-583) (Fletcher-class destroyer) Philippines campaign Battle of Iwo Jima Battle of Okinawa
  • 1943: USS Halligan (DD-584) (Fletcher-class destroyer) Philippines campaign Battle of Iwo Jima Battle of Okinawa
  • 1943: USS Haraden (DD-585) (Fletcher-class destroyer) Philippines campaign
  • 1943: USS Newcomb (DD-586) (Fletcher-class destroyer) Battle of Surigao Strait Battle of Iwo Jima Battle of Okinawa
  • 1943: USS Bennion (DD-662) (Fletcher-class destroyer) Battle of Leyte Battle of Iwo Jima Battle of Okinawa
  • 1943: USS Heywood L. Edwards (DD-663) (Fletcher-class destroyer) Battle of Surigao Strait Battle of Iwo Jima Battle of Okinawa
  • 1943: USS Richard P. Leary (DD-664) (Fletcher-class destroyer) Battle of Surigao Strait Battle of Iwo Jima Battle of Okinawa
  • 1942: HMS Bayntun (Captain-class frigate) shared credit for sinking U-757, U-1279, U-989 & U-1278
  • 1942: HMS Bazely (Captain-class frigate) shared credit for sinking U-648, U-600 & U-636
  • 1942: HMS Berry (Captain-class frigate) Battle of the Atlantic
  • 1942: HMS Blackwood (Captain-class frigate) shared credit for sinking U-648 & U-600
  • 1942: USS Evarts (DE-5) (Evarts-class destroyer escort) Battle of the Atlantic
  • 1942: USS Wyffels (DE-6) (Evarts-class destroyer escort) Battle of the Atlantic
  • 1943: USS Griswold (DE-7) (Evarts-class destroyer escort) shared credit for sinking I-39 Battle of Okinawa
  • 1943: USS Steele (DE-8) (Evarts-class destroyer escort) Pacific Theater of Operations
  • 1943: USS Carlson (DE-9) (Evarts-class destroyer escort) Battle of Okinawa
  • 1943: USS Bebas (DE-10) (Evarts-class destroyer escort) Battle of Okinawa
  • 1943: USS Crouter (DE-11) (Evarts-class destroyer escort) Battle of Okinawa
  • 1943: HMS Burges (Captain-class frigate) shared credit for sinking U-1063
  • 1943: USS Seid (DE-256) (Evarts-class destroyer escort) Battle of Okinawa
  • 1943: USS Smartt (DE-257) (Evarts-class destroyer escort) Battle of the Atlantic
  • 1943: USS Walter S. Brown (DE-258) (Evarts-class destroyer escort) Battle of the Atlantic
  • 1943: USS William C. Miller (DE-259) (Evarts-class destroyer escort) shared credit for sinking Japanese submarine I-55 (1944)
  • 1943: USS Cabana (DE-260) (Evarts-class destroyer escort) Pacific Theater of Operations
  • 1943: USS Dionne (DE-261) (Evarts-class destroyer escort) Pacific Theater of Operations
  • 1943: USS Canfield (DE-262) (Evarts-class destroyer escort) Pacific Theater of Operations
  • 1943: USS Deede (DE-263) (Evarts-class destroyer escort) Pacific Theater of Operations
  • 1943: USS Elden (DE-264) (Evarts-class destroyer escort) Pacific Theater of Operations
  • 1943: USS Cloues (DE-265) (Evarts-class destroyer escort) Battle of Okinawa
  • 1943: HMS Capel (Captain-class frigate) Battle of the Atlantic
  • 1943: HMS Cooke (Captain-class frigate) shared credit for sinking U-988 & U-214
  • 1943: HMS Dacres (Captain-class frigate) Normandy Invasion
  • 1943: HMS Domett (Captain-class frigate) shared credit for sinking U-988
  • 1943: HMS Foley (Captain-class frigate) shared credit for sinking U-538
  • 1943: HMS Garlies (Captain-class frigate) shared credit for sinking U-358
  • 1943: HMS Gould (Captain-class frigate) shared credit for sinking U-91 & U-358
  • 1943: HMS Grindall (Captain-class frigate) Battle of the Atlantic
  • 1943: HMS Gardiner (Captain-class frigate) Battle of the Atlantic
  • 1943: HMS Goodall (Captain-class frigate) Battle of the Atlantic
  • 1943: HMS Goodson (Captain-class frigate) Battle of the Atlantic
  • 1943: HMS Gore (Captain-class frigate) shared credit for sinking U-91 & U-358
  • 1943: HMS Keats (Captain-class frigate) shared credit for sinking U-1172 & U-285
  • 1943: HMS Kempthorne (Captain-class frigate) Battle of the Atlantic
  • 1943: HMS Kingsmill (Captain-class frigate) Normandy Invasion
  • 1943: HMS Lawford (Captain-class frigate) Normandy Invasion
  • 1943: HMS Louis (Captain-class frigate) shared credit for sinking U-445
  • 1943: HMS Lawson (Captain-class frigate) Battle of the Atlantic
  • 1943: HMS Pasley (Captain-class frigate) Battle of the Atlantic
  • 1943: HMS Loring (Captain-class frigate) Battle of the Atlantic
  • 1943: HMS Hoste (Captain-class frigate) Battle of the Atlantic
  • 1943: HMS Moorsom (Captain-class frigate) Battle of the Atlantic
  • 1943: HMS Manners (Captain-class frigate) shared credit for sinking U-1051
  • 1943: HMS Mounsey (Captain-class frigate) Battle of the Atlantic
  • 1943: HMS Inglis (Captain-class frigate) Battle of the Atlantic
  • 1943: HMS Inman (Captain-class frigate) Battle of the Atlantic
  • 1943: USS O'Toole (DE-527) (Evarts-class destroyer escort) Battle of the Atlantic
  • 1943: USS John J. Powers (DE-528) (Evarts-class destroyer escort) Battle of the Atlantic
  • 1943: USS Mason (DE-529) (Evarts-class destroyer escort) Battle of the Atlantic
  • 1943: USS John M. Bermingham (DE-530) (Evarts-class destroyer escort) Battle of the Atlantic
  • 1943: USS Edward H. Allen (DE-531) (John C. Butler–class destroyer escort) rescued crew of the SS Andrea Doria
  • 1943: USS Tweedy (DE-532) (John C. Butler–class destroyer escort)
  • 1943: USS Howard F. Clark (DE-533) (John C. Butler–class destroyer escort) Battle for Leyte Gulf Battle of Okinawa
  • 1943: USS Silverstein (DE-534) (John C. Butler–class destroyer escort) Pacific Theater of Operations Korean War
  • 1943: USS Lewis (DE-535) (John C. Butler–class destroyer escort) Pacific Theater of Operations
  • 1943: USS Bivin (DE-536) (John C. Butler–class destroyer escort) Pacific Theater of Operations
  • 1943: USS Rizzi (DE-537) (John C. Butler–class destroyer escort)
  • 1943: USS Osberg (DE-538) (John C. Butler–class destroyer escort)
  • 1945: USS Donner (LSD-20) (Casa Grande-class dock landing ship) Mercury-Redstone 2 recovery
  • 1945: USS Fort Mandan (LSD-21) (Casa Grande-class dock landing ship)
  • 1945: USS Tortuga (LSD-26) (Casa Grande-class dock landing ship) Korean War Vietnam War
  • 1945: USS Whetstone (LSD-27) (Casa Grande-class dock landing ship) Korean War Vietnam War
  • 1955: USS Wagner (DER-539) (John C. Butler–class destroyer escort)
  • 1955: USS Vandivier (DER-540) (John C. Butler–class destroyer escort)

NavWeaps Forums

Battle of Aughrim: Bloodiest battle ever fought on Irish soil.

Jul 12, 2019 #1452 2019-07-12T23:22

1812 - Frigate USS Essex, commanded by Capt. David Porter, captures merchant brig, Lamprey, in the Atlantic.

1854 - Sloop of war USS Cyane, bombards San Juan del Norte (Greytown), Nicaragua, in retaliation for ill-treatment of U.S. citizens. Marines and Sailors also seize weapons and powder in retribution for an attack on U.S. Consular officials for U.S. refusal to pay reparation.

1863 - American Civil War: City-class ironclad gunboat USS Baron De Kalb (DeKalb) was sunk by a Confederate mine without loss of life in the Yazoo River 1 or 2 miles (1.6 to 3.2 km) below Yazoo City, Mississippi.

1863 - American Civil War: CSS Edward J. Gay, an 823-ton sidewheel paddle steamer, was burned and scuttled as a blockship by Confederate forces in the Yazoo River at the mouth of the Yalobusha River near Yazoo City, Mississippi, both to obstruct the Yalobusha and to prevent capture by Union forces.

1863 - American Civil War: Two unidentified Confederate steamers – possibly Fort Hindman and James Thompson – were burned in the Little Red River in Louisiana by sidewheel gunboats USS Manitou and USS Rattler.

1939 - Rear Adm. Richard Byrd is appointed to command the 1939-1941 U.S. Antarctic Service Expedition. Under objectives outlined by President Franklin D. Roosevelt, Byrd establishes an east and west base and holds a wide range of scientific observations until international tensions end the expedition in early 1941.

1942 - On 7 July, American freighter Oneida cleared San Juan, Puerto Rico, en route to Punta Gorda, Cuba. She sailed with Convoy NG-359 but straggled from the formation. When about two miles north of Cape Maisi, on the eastern tip of Cuba, U-166 attacked. The master saw the wake of the torpedo too late to take evasive action. The torpedo struck amidships at the waterline just aft of the engine room. The explosion extensively damaged the ship, and the Oneida sank three minutes later. The crew of eight officers and twenty-one men had no time to launch boats and abandoned the freighter in two rafts. Two officers and four men died in the attack-three of them on watch below. The survivors reached the coast of Cuba in several hours.

1942 - On 10 July, U. S. tanker R. W Gallagher departed Baytown, Texas, en route to Port Everglades, Florida. As she was about eighty miles SW by W from Southwest Pass in the Mississippi Delta, U-67 attacked the ship. A torpedo struck the starboard side at the #3 tank just forward of amidships, and the second struck five seconds later abaft the midships house between the #8 tank and the pump room. The explosion buckled parts of the ship and started a fire that quickly spread the length of the vessel and into the water. The ship immediately took a 30° list to starboard and later capsized and sank at 0315.
With the steam whistle jammed, the crew of eight officers and thirty-two men and the twelve armed guards abandoned the ship in the #4 lifeboat and one raft and by jumping into the water. The fire consumed the other boats and rafts before they could be launched. The master remained on the bow for forty minutes until the flames forced him into the water. USCGC Boutwell (WPC-130) began picking up the survivors within an hour. A Coast Guard plane removed three of the most seriously wounded and flew them to New Orleans for hospitalization. Two officers, six crewmen, and two armed guards perished in the flames. Two others died ashore after reaching the hospital.

1943 - On 6 July, Liberty Ship Timothy Pickering sailed from Alexandria, Egypt, to Avola, Sicily. She had anchored with the convoy just off Avola beach, when dive bombers attacked the ship at 1145. A 500-pound bomb struck at the fore part of the #4 hold, penetrated the deck, and exploded in the engine room and the #4 deep tank. This caused the cargo to explode and created a hole twenty feet square on the starboard side of the #4 hold. Fire broke out and engulfed the entire amidships as the ship settled on her after end. The ship's complement of 8 officers, 35 men, and 23 armed guards, together with the 128 British troops on board, had no time to launch boats. Some jumped into the water others climbed down ropes and the anchor chain to escape the flames. The craft from other vessels in the convoy rescued most of these men. An invasion barge picked up five men and put them on SS O'Henry. Others went on board hospital ship HMS Amra. The inferno trapped many men below, and several tried to escape through portholes and burned to death. Three officers, nineteen merchant crewmen, sixteen armed guards, and all but one of the British troops died in the attack. A British destroyer sunk the vessel with a torpedo at 1330. Pickering broke in two, and her bow rested on the beach above the water.

1945 - Consolidated B-24H-20-FO Liberator, 42-94956, c/n 1721, of the 2135th Base Unit, Tyndall Field (now Tyndall Air Force Base), Florida, piloted by Paul R. Snyder, crashes due to bad weather 12 miles NW of Southport, Florida, with fatal results for the crew.

1950 - A USAF Boeing B-50D Superfortress, 49–267, of the 97th Bomb Wing out of Biggs AFB (now Biggs Army Airfield), El Paso, Texas, carrying a nuclear weapon bomb casing (but no fissile pit), stalls at 7,000 feet (2,100 m) at about 1454 hrs. EST, crashes between Lebanon and Mason, Ohio, killing four officers and twelve airmen. No radio communication was received before the crash, and although all crew wore parachutes, none bailed out. HE in bomb casing explodes on impact leaving crater 200X25 feet, explosion heard for 25 miles (40 km). One account states that the weather was clear, but Joe Baugher reports that bomber was in a storm system.

1956 - USAF Douglas C-118A Liftmaster, 53-3301, c/n 44671, encountered windshear after takeoff at

1600 hrs. from McGuire Air Force Base (now part of Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst), lost altitude and crashed in pine-wooded swamp near Fort Dix (also now part of Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst), New Jersey, 46 killed, 20 survivors. The aircraft broke into several pieces as it landed on its belly but did not burn. The aircraft, carrying 10 crew, 41 enlisted men, nine officers and six civilians, was bound for Burtonwood, England, and was taking servicemen and military dependents to foreign posts. Weather was described as rain and a hailstorm. "Capt. Tom Hamrick, information officer at Dix, said the pilot apparently tried to level off and crash land. The plane cut a swath through the brush and pines for 300 yards."

1956 - A USAF Boeing B-47E-100-BW Stratojet, 52-0572, of the 40th Bomb Wing crashes and explodes at the end of the runway on take-off from Smoky Hill Air Force Base (now Salina Regional Airport), Kansas, killing all four crew. "Witnesses said the plane just got off the runway and cleared a fence before crashing and bursting into flames. The explosion followed."

1956 - Two North American F-86 Sabres, of the 82d Fighter Squadron, collide in mid-air

eight miles E of Dixon, California, and crash in an open field, the California Highway Patrol reports. Both pilots eject and parachute safely and are recovered by state officers, a patrolman said. The pilot of Gov. Goodwin J. Knight's plane, flying in the vicinity, spotted the chutes and radioed their position and then served as an observer until the CHP located the pilots. They were found to have suffered only minor injuries. "A spokesman at Travis Air Force Base identified the pilots as 1st Lt. Albert C. Mitchell and 1st Lt. Albert F. Crews of the 82nd Fighter Squadron at Travis."

1956 - "EL CENTRO (AP)-The pilot of an AD-6 Skyraider was killed Friday when his plane crashed on the desert 25 miles northwest of here during a practice dive bombing mission. The Navy said he was attached to a fleet air gunnery unit at the El Centro Naval Auxiliary Air Station (now Naval Air Facility). His name was withheld pending notification of the family."

1956 - "Belington, W. Va., July 13, UP – A navy Fury jet fighter plane en route from Patuxent, Md. Naval Air Test Center to Columbus, Oh., crashed, exploded and burned on a farm north of here today, killing the pilot Lt. Cmdr. Horatio Gates Sickel Jr." Aircraft was FJ-3, BuNo 136091.

1966 – Former USS Ulvert M. Moore (DE-442) was sunk as a target off San Nicholas Island, California, by surface gunfire and aircraft from USS Coral Sea (CVA-43).

1972 – Former USS O'Brien (DD-725) was sunk as a target off California.

1982 - A United States Marine Corps F-4S Phantom II, BuNo. 158377, upgraded from an F-4J-47-MC, flew into the ground close to MCAS Yuma, Arizona, both crew killed.

1982 - A United States Marine Corps F-4S Phantom II, BuNo. 153819, of VMFA-251, upgraded from an F-4J-30-MC, crashed into the Atlantic Ocean off South Carolina. Joe Baugher lists this, and notes that the same airframe is also reported to have been damaged beyond repair as a QF-4S during a high-speed power turn at San Nicholas, California on 28 April 1999.

1985 - Blue Angels Aircraft 5, BuNo 155029, and 6, BuNo 154992, (Douglas A-4F Skyhawk) collide at the top of a loop at 1532 hrs., Niagara Falls International Airport, New York, during the Western New York Air Show '85, killing Lt. Cmdr. Michael Gershon. Second pilot, Lt. Andy Caputi, ejects safely with only minor injuries. One Skyhawk crashed on airport grounds while the second fighter impacted in a nearby auto junkyard. The demonstration team resumes show duties 20 July at Dayton, Ohio, but omits maneuver that resulted in crash, and flies with five aircraft rather than six.

1988 - US Marine Corps McDonnell-Douglas AV-8B-3 Harrier II, BuNo 161582, c/n 512014/14, of VMAT-203, crashes at MCAS Cherry Point, North Carolina.

1992 - McDonnell-Douglas F-15C Eagle 85-0116 of the 60th Fighter Squadron, 33rd Fighter Wing, based at Eglin AFB, Florida, crashes at 0900 hrs. in the Gulf of Mexico, 90 miles S of Eglin. The pilot, assigned to the 60th Fighter Squadron, ejects safely and is rescued. He and another F-15 had departed Eglin at 0835 hrs. for a training mission.

2006 – An AH-64D Apache from 4–4th Aviation Regiment shot down south of Baghdad. The two pilots survive.

Jul 13, 2019 #1453 2019-07-13T23:42

1813 - During the War of 1812, Lt. John M. Gamble becomes the first Marine to command a ship in battle, USS Greenwich, when she captures British whaling ship Seringapatam.

1853 - Commodore Matthew C. Perry lands and holds the first meeting with the Japanese at Uraga, in which he delivers President Millard Fillmore’s request for a treaty to representatives to the Emperor. Allowing time for reflection and discussion, Commodore Perry returns in March 1854 and finalizes the Treaty of Kanagawa.

1863 - American Civil War: CSS Magnolia, an 824-ton sidewheel paddle steamer, was burned by Confederate forces on the Yazoo River 4 to 5 miles (6.5 to 8 km) above Yazoo City, Mississippi, to prevent her capture by approaching United States Navy gunboats.

1863 - American Civil War: CSS Mary E. Keene, a 659-ton sidewheel paddle steamer, was scuttled by Confederate forces in Mississippi at the foot of French Bend in the Yazoo River either near Yazoo City or 2 miles (3.2 km) below Greenwood to prevent capture by approaching United States Navy gunboats. Union forces burned the portion of the wreck above the waterline on 24 July.

1863 - American Civil War: CSS Peytona, a 685-ton sidewheel paddle steamer, was burned and scuttled by Confederate forces in the Yazoo River at Eureka Landing near Satartia, Mississippi, to prevent her capture by United States Navy gunboats.

1863 – American Civil War: Sternwheel or sidewheel steamer CSS J. F. Pargoud (J. Frank Paragoud), 338 or 522 tons, was scuttled 3 miles from Greenwood, Mississippi (upstream/downstream?) on the Yazoo River adjacent to Fort Pemberton on 13 May 1863, and burned on 14 July 1863, to prevent capture by Rear Adm. David D. Porter's Union fleet.

1863 - American Civil War: CSS Prince of Wales, a 572-ton sidewheel paddle steamer, was burned by Confederate forces on the Yazoo River opposite Andrews Landing near Yazoo City, Mississippi, to prevent her capture by United States Navy gunboats.

1863 - American Civil War: Gunboat USS Sciota collided with screw steamer USS Antona on the Mississippi River in Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana, about 8 miles (13 km) above Quarantine Station (about 4.5 nm (8.3 km) downstream from present day Port Sulphur) and sank. She was refloated in late August, repaired, and returned to service.

1916 - USS Hector (AC-7) ran aground some 13 nm (25 km) East of the Cape Romain Lighthouse, SC., and sank three days later.

1942 - In fog and choppy seas, U. S. merchantman Arcata was attacked by I-7 while en route from Bethel, Alaska, to Seattle, Washington. The master kept the vessel on a non-evasive course until I-7 surfaced and started shelling the freighter some 315 nm (585 km) SW by S of Kodiak, Alaska. The helmsman then began changing course rapidly, and the ship temporarily evaded the submarine. Ten minutes later I-7 reappeared and began shelling the freighter again. The sub fired over twenty-five shots, and at least eleven struck the freighter. The gunfire eventually damaged the steering engine and set the forecastle bridge and poop afire. About an hour and thirty minutes after the first shell struck, the ship hove to and the men on board abandoned her. Seven officers, twenty-two men, three Navy men, and a passenger began leaving the ship in one lifeboat and four rafts. I-7 fired on the life rafts and fatally wounded one crewman. Two officers and six men perished. USS Kane (DD-235) rescued eleven men on a raft, and halibut boat Yukon rescued the remaining fourteen men in the lifeboat.

1943 - On 11 July, American Liberty Ship Robert Bacon sailed independently from Mombasa, Kenya, to Cape Town, South Africa. About 25 nm (47 km) SE by E of Mozambique, U-178 fired two torpedoes at the freighter. The first crossed the ship's bow, and the second struck the port side at the #2 hatch in one of the fuel bunkers. The ship immediately listed 10° to starboard, but appeared not to be sinking. The explosion blew oil and water into the air, destroyed steam lines, and damaged a great deal of the ship's equipment. The engineer on watch stopped the engines, and the crew of nine officers, thirty-five men, and twenty seven armed guards mustered at their boat stations. The crew found two of the lifeboats unusable because they were filled with water and oil. They cleared the ship in the three other lifeboats and three rafts. After the crew abandoned the freighter, a second torpedo struck the starboard side. At daybreak, U-178 fired a third torpedo that hit the starboard side aft, causing the ship to sink ten minutes later, plunging by the bow. The submarine surfaced and the Germans questioned the occupants of the #3 boat, giving them directions to land before leaving. This boat remained in the vicinity of the sinking until the next morning and then headed for Mozambique. On 16 July, the #3 boat, with the master in charge, reached Mozambique Harbor, and a tug towed it to the custom's pier.
British SS English Prince rescued fourteen survivors in another boat, and British tanker SS Steaua Romana picked up several more in the last boat on the 27th. One raft stayed at sea for fourteen days, one for twenty days, and the final raft made landfall forty-four days after the attack. Two men never reached the lifeboats, and a third died ashore from exposure.

1944 - The crash of Beechcraft UC-45B Expeditor, 43-35569, of the 115th Base Unit, Godman Army Airfield, Fort Knox, Kentucky, in a violent storm, at Chattanooga, Tennessee, kills U.S. Army Maj. Gen. Paul W. Newgarden, commander of the 10th Armored Division, and five other officers, including two colonels.
"In the plane, which disintegrated after crashing headlong through an orchard, were Col. Renn Lawrence, commander of a combat unit 2d Lt. J. R. Lockett, Granada,[sic] Miss. Flight Officer E. S. Ihle, Slater, Ia., and Staff Sgt. F. J. Allbright, Bradford, O. The army withheld the name of the second colonel, pending notification of next of kin. All were en route from Fort Knox, Ky., to Augusta, Ga., where Gen. Newgarden was to have reviewed troops of the 10th armored division in celebration of the second anniversary of his command. Col. Howard Clark, Fort Oglethorpe commander, said the plane was torn into small pieces when it sheared through the orchard after narrowly missing a dormitory of the Bonny Oaks school." The twin-engine aircraft, piloted by Everett S. Ihle, comes down three miles NE of Chattanooga Municipal Airport.

1945 - North American TB-25C Mitchell, (built as B-25C-1), 41-13105, assigned to the 409th Fighter Squadron, 372d Fighter Group, Esler Army Air Field (also known as Esler Regional Airport) near Pineville, Louisiana, crashes and burns one mile NW of Weldon, Texas, in a heavy rainstorm, killing nine crew.

1945 - Boeing B-29-50-MO Superfortress, 44-86329, of the 237th Army Air Forces Base Unit (Combat Crew Training School), suffers engine failure on takeoff from Kirtland Field (now Kirtland Air Force Base), Albuquerque, New Mexico, and crashes, killing 13 and injuring one.

1949 - A Fairchild C-82A-15-FA Packet, 44-23014, c/n 10058, crashes into a parking lot in Area B of Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio. While conducting routine drop testing in Area C of the base, the C-82 attempted an emergency landing in Area B. With its electrical system down and the right engine on fire, the plane landed

three-quarters down the runway, running off the end of the runway across a grassy area, plowing through a steel fence, and ran over a number of cars in the main parking lot near Highway 4 before flipping onto its back. Fire crews were on the scene immediately. The only person killed was MSgt Lubitz, Flight Test Division, who jumped from the plane just before it hit the fence. The other four crew were only slightly injured and no one on the ground was hurt.

1950 - A US Air Force RB-29 was shot at near Permskoye airfield in the USSR, but escaped.

1955 - Vought F7U-3 Cutlass, BuNo 129595, 'D 412', of VF-124, suffers ramp strike on landing aboard USS Hancock (CVA-19) during carrier qualifications off of the California coast, disintegrating airframe spins off portside pilot LCDR Jay Alkire, USNR, executive officer of VF-124, killed when airframe sinks, still strapped into ejection seat also killed are two boatswain's mates, one photographer's mate, in port catwalk by burning fuel.
Video 1
Video 2 (5:45)

1960 - Lockheed U-2A, 56-6720, Article 387, the 27th airframe of the first USAF production batch, delivered in October 1957 and assigned to the 4080th Strategic Reconnaissance Wing, Laughlin AFB, Texas, as a "ferret" aircraft, crashes in the early morning

30 miles NE of Laughlin. Pilot Maj. Raleigh Myers experiences an oxygen fire in the cockpit after a pressure-reducing switch fails, ignited by the 24-volt power supply line to the switch. He bails out at 24,000 feet (7,300 m), escaping safely. The oxygen supply system is subsequently redesigned.

1977 - A US Army CH-47 Chinook was downed over the Korean demilitarized zone by a North Korean MiG-21 Fishbed. The CH-47's pilot was captured and the other three crew members, Robert Haynes, Joesph Miles and Ronald Wells, were killed. The pilot was released after 57 hours of captivity.

1996 - NATO Boeing E-3B Sentry AWACS LX-N90457 overruns runway into sea on take-off from Preveza AFB (now Aktion National Airport and also known as Preveza Airport), Preveza, Greece. Fuselage breaks in two, but no casualties among crew of 16. Aircraft had rolled out at Boeing Renton, Washington plant on 21 April 1984, first flown 5 June 1984. Delivered to NATO on 19 December 1984 after AEW suite fitted out by Dornier.

1999 – Former USS William C. Lawe (DD-763) was sunk as a target.

2004 – Former USS Kinkaid (DD-965) was sunk as a target some 48 nm (90 km) NNW of Kauai, Hawaii.

2008 – Former USS Cushing (DD-985) was sunk about 65 nm (122 km) NW by N of Kauai, Hawaii during RIMPAC 2008.

2008 – Former USS Horne (CG-30) was sunk as a target some 46 nm (86 km) N by W of Kauai, Hawaii.

2010 – Former USS Monticello (LSD-35) was sunk as a target about 53 nm (98 km) NNW of Kauai, Hawaii.

2012 – Former USS Niagara Falls (T-AFS-3) was sunk in a live-fire exercise, as part of RIMPAC 2012, 63 miles southwest of Kauai, HI.

2016 – Former USS Thach (FFG-43) was sunk as a target some 50 nm (89 km) North of Kauai, Hawaii. Despite being hit by at least four anti-ship missiles, bombs, Hellfire missiles and a torpedo, she took twelve hours to sink.

Jul 14, 2019 #1454 2019-07-14T23:38

1862 - American Civil War: While screw ironclad CSS Arkansas made her way down the Yazoo River, she encountered Union gunboats USS Carondelet, USS Tyler, and USS Queen of the West. In the ensuing battle, Arkansas damaged the first two vessels and made her way into the Mississippi River, where she fought through the Federal fleet to find refuge at the Confederate batteries at Vicksburg, Miss.

1862 - American Civil War: Sailing mortar schooner USS Sidney C. Jones was blown up and burned on the Mississippi River after grounding in a few feet of water because CSS Arkansas came downriver from Vicksburg.

1864 – American Civil War: These Union ships were burned by Confederates on the Mississippi River at St. Louis:
Sidewheel paddle steamers -
Cherokee, 261-tons,
Glasgow, 296-tons,
Northerner, 332-tons,
Sunshine, 354-tons,
Welcome, 499-tons,
Edward F. Dix, 296-tons, she was ultimately repaired and returned to service.

1930 - 1st Lt. Frank Benjamin Tyndall (1894–1930) is killed in a crash of a Curtiss P-1F Hawk, 28–61, out of Langley Field (now Joint Base Langley–Eustis), Virginia, near Mooresville, North Carolina. Lieutenant Tyndall was a World War I pilot, Silver Star recipient, and commander of the 22d Aero Squadron. Lieutenant Tyndall shot down four enemy airplanes in combat over France during World War I. Tyndall Field, Florida, opened on 13 January 1941 as a gunnery range, is named for him. With the establishment of the United States Air Force in 1947, the facility was renamed Tyndall Air Force Base on 13 January 1948. Tyndall was the second Air Service pilot to survive by parachuting, when his MB-3A broke up on 11 November 1922 over the Boeing factory, Seattle, Washington.

1942 – American tanker Pennsylvania Sun sailed from Port Arthur, Texas, to Belfast, Ireland. At 0130, 93 nm (172 km) WSW of Key West, Florida, an aircraft illuminated the tanker to identify her. The mate on watch ran up the appropriate flag hoist. He then returned to the wheelhouse to change the ship's zigzag course when a torpedo fired by U-571 struck amidships on the port side between the #5 and #6 tanks. The explosion blew away the port wing of the bridge, and flames immediately engulfed the ship. The master had the vessel steered southeast for five 1inutes and then ordered the engines stopped. The radio operator meanwhile sent distress signals and received a reply. The nine officers, thirty-three crewmen, and seventeen armed guards left the tanker in three lifeboats. They rowed away from the tanker and put out sea anchors to wait for a rescue vessel. The Quartermaster and a seaman died in the explosion. USS Dahlgren (DD-187) picked up the survivors three and one-half hours after the attack and landed them at Key West. The next evening, the master, three officers, and the crew of Navy salvage tug USS Willet (ARS-12) returned to the ship and helped extinguish the flames. Willet later towed the vessel to port, and after repairs at Chester, Pennsylvania, she went back in service.

1942 – U. S. merchantman Chilore was torpedoed by U-576, 62 nm (115 km) E by S of the Cape Lookout Lighthouse, North Carolina, while en route from Baltimore, Maryland, to Trinidad, BWI, in Convoy KS-520. A torpedo hit well below the waterline on the port side beneath the port hawse pipe. This reduced the ship's speed to five knots as the forepeak flooded.
The master ordered the helmsman to steer a zigzagging course as Chilore dropped out of the convoy. Panamanian-flagged freighter J. A. Mowinckel and Nicaraguan ship Bluefield joined the exodus after U-576 torpedoed them. Chilore, unfortunately, wandered to the edge of the Cape Hatteras minefield. A blimp warned the master, but he thought that the flares dropped by the blimp indicated the presence of a submarine and he proceeded. Two mines hit the port side wing tanks at the #2 and #4 hatches.
After these explosions part of the ship's complement of eight officers, thirty-four men, and nine armed guards tried to abandon the ship before ordered to do so by the master. The only deaths occurred when two men fell out of one of the lifeboats and drowned. The remaining men abandoned ship at 2100, and Coast Guard craft picked them up and landed them at Ocracoke, NC. A Navy salvage crew later prepared the ship to be towed, but during the trip she capsized and sank at the entrance to the Chesapeake Bay.

1942 - During Operation Bolero, the ferrying of combat aircraft from the U.S. to England by air, a flight of two Boeing B-17E-BO Flying Fortress bombers, 41-9101, c/n 2573, "Big Stoop", and 41-9105, c/n 2577, "Do-Do", of the 97th Bomb Group and six Lockheed P-38F Lightnings of the 94th Fighter Squadron, 1st Fighter Group, on the 845-mile (1,360 km) leg between Bluie West 8 airfield (now Kangerlussuaq Airport, Greenland) and Reykjavík, Iceland, run out of fuel after being held up by bad weather, and all force-land on the Greenland icecap. All safely belly in except for the first P-38 which attempts a wheels-down landing, flipping over as nosewheel catches a crevasse, but pilot Lt. Brad McManus unhurt. All crews rescued on 19 July, but aircraft are abandoned in place.
One P-38F-1-LO, 41-7630, c/n 222-5757, now known as "Glacier Girl", recovered in 1992 from under 200 feet (61 m) of accumulated snow and ice and rebuilt to flying status, registered N17630. One Boeing B-17 ("Big Stoop") also found, but it is too badly crushed for recovery. Although the USAAF had expected to lose 10 percent of the 920 planes that made the North Atlantic transit during Bolero, losses were only 5.2 percent, the majority being involved in this single incident.
"Glacier Girl"

1944 - Consolidated B-24J-5-FO Liberator, 42-50871, of the 272d Base Unit, Topeka AAF (now Topeka Regional Airport), Kansas, piloted by Levine S. Nelson, crashes one mile NW of Ashville, New York, killing all five crew.
"Syracuse, N. Y., July 15 (AP) - Lt. Harry A. Dunn, public relations officer of the Syracuse army air base, announced tonight the names of the five flyers killed in the crash of an army bomber near Blockville, N. Y., early today. The dead include 2nd Lt. Vernon E. Stiltz, Milwaukee, Wis. 2nd Lt. John Jurzazak, Chicago, and Sgt. Art L. Brown, Sterling, Ill."
The Aviation Archaeological Investigation and Research website indicates that the bomber was involved in a midair collision, but provides no further details, and no other aircraft appear in accident report listings at this location this date.

1945 - A Boeing B-29A-45-BN Superfortress, 44-61721, c/n 11198, of the 236th Army Air Forces Base Unit (Combat Crew Training School), Pyote Field (now unused land near Pyote), Texas, piloted by Lieutenant Edward J. Szycher, of Bayonne, New Jersey, goes missing after the crew bails out at 9,500 feet over northern Minnesota, 180 miles NNW of St. Paul, Minnesota. The bomber became filled with gasoline fumes that threatened to asphyxiate the crew. All ten crew descend safely, although one lands in Napoleon Lake in Itasca County, and has to swim ashore. Airframe has never been discovered.

1953 - First of two Convair XP5Y-1s (and only one to fly), BuNo 121455, is lost on 42nd flight during high-speed testing by pilot Don Germeraad over the Pacific near San Diego, California. While operating at 115 percent of design limits under Navy contract, the elevator torque tube breaks, aircraft commences cycle of rollercoaster climbs and dives which continues for 25 minutes until control obviously being lost, all eleven on board go over the side and are rescued. Flying boat crashes into the ocean and sinks

six miles off Point Loma, wreckage never recovered. A chase plane awaiting a Convair F2Y Sea Dart filmed the final minutes of the hair-raising flight, but it was classified secret and has probably never been released. Airframe had over 102 hours of flight time. When first flown on 18 April 1950, it was the first turboprop-powered flying boat to fly.

1956 - "CLAREMORE, Okla. (UP)-An Air Force pilot, with both engines gone, 'deadsticked' his C-45 transport to a perfect landing between two underpasses on an uncompleted toll highway near here Sunday. The pilot, Capt. Charles Bixel, 38, Riverside, Calif., and his sole passenger, A-2C Josef Grafues, St. Louis, were not hurt. The plane was undamaged."

1962 – Former USS Weber (APD-75) was sunk as a target by an air-launched AGM-12 Bullpup missile.

1963 - Two North American F-100 Super Sabres of the 492d Tactical Fighter Squadron, 48th Tactical Fighter Wing, based at RAF Lakenheath, Suffolk, suffer mid-air collision during routine gunnery exercise on the Holbeach Range. Both aircraft came down in the sea five miles off King's Lynn.
Pilot 1st Lt L. C. Marshall parachuted from North American F-100D-45-NH, AF Ser. No. 55-2792, c/n 224-59, rescued from his dinghy by helicopter, but 1st Lt D. F. Ware rode AF Ser. No. 55-2786 to his death.

1964 - A Soviet Tu-16 Badger crashed in the Sea of Japan near USS Bennington (CVS-20), USS Eversole (DD-789) and USS Cunningham (DD-752).

1969 – Former USS Manta (SS-299) was sunk as a target off Hampton, Virginia.

2004 – Former USS Harry W. Hill (DD-986) was sunk as a target during RIMPAC 2004, 52 nm (96 km) NNW of Kauai, Hawaii.

2006 – Former USS Mars (T-AFS-1) was sunk as a target 71 nm (131 km) NW of Kauai, Hawaii.


یواس‌اس بیوین (دی‌یی-۵۳۶)

یواس‌اس بیوین (دی‌یی-۵۳۶) (به انگلیسی: USS Bivin (DE-536) ) یک کشتی بود که طول آن ۳۰۶ فوت (۹۳ متر) بود. این کشتی در سال ۱۹۴۳ ساخته شد.

یواس‌اس بیوین (دی‌یی-۵۳۶)
پیشینه
مالک
آب‌اندازی: ۳ نوامبر ۱۹۴۳
آغاز کار: ۷ دسامبر ۱۹۴۳
اعزام: ۳۱ اکتبر ۱۹۴۴
مشخصات اصلی
وزن: 1,350/1,745 tons
درازا: ۳۰۶ فوت (۹۳ متر)
پهنا: ۳۶ فوت ۱۰ اینچ (۱۱٫۲۳ متر)
آبخور: ۱۳ فوت ۴ اینچ (۴٫۰۶ متر)
سرعت: 24 knots

این یک مقالهٔ خرد کشتی یا قایق است. می‌توانید با گسترش آن به ویکی‌پدیا کمک کنید.


Views That Have Vanished: The Photographs of David Bivin

In the early 1960s, David Bivin went to study at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Armed with a Yashica-D medium-format camera, Bivin traveled the land of Israel and the surrounding regions taking
photographs of biblical sites, archaeological excavations, and everyday scenes. Today these photographs provide a window on a land that has changed radically, as a result of the construction of cities, the Six Day War, and the unification of Jerusalem.

This volume includes more than 700 photographs in high-resolution (1600x1200 or higher) jpg format, which means the images look crisp and clear even when projected on a large screen. All of the images are also included in pre-made PowerPoint® files for classroom teaching. Explanatory notes are included in the PowerPoint® files. The collection includes photographs of Israel, the West Bank, Jordan, Greece, and Rome.

"Views That Have Vanished is a great addition to the already long list of photographic materials published by BiblePlaces. The CD belongs in the library of every church and every person who teaches Bible classes with an emphasis on the land in which these historical events took place. Frequently I say to my groups, "I wish you could have seen this before. . . ." Now, you can see it through these photographs."

&mdashFerrell Jenkins, Retired Chair of Biblical Studies, Florida College

About the Photographer: David Bivin is director of Jerusalem Perspective (www.JerusalemPerspective.com), and a member of the Jerusalem School of Synoptic Research, a research organization made up of Jewish and Christian scholars dedicated to better understanding the Synoptic Gospels.

About the Producer: Dr. Todd Bolen is a Professor of Biblical Studies at The Master&rsquos University. He lived and taught for many years at their campus near Jerusalem. He is the producer of more than 60 volumes of photographs illustrating the biblical world, including the Pictorial Library of Bible Lands and the Photo Companion to the Bible.

Cost: $30 (free shipping in the U.S.)

Or buy the complete 20-volume set for $394 $199

Guarantee: You will be satisfied or your money will be refunded.


"For years now, Todd Bolen's wonderful collection of photos of Biblical sites has been an indispensible tool of my preaching and teaching ministry. My congregation loves to see as well as hear about the places where Biblical events happened. This new collection fills in a critical gap, allowing us to see the Holy Land before the massive changes that have taken place in the past 50 years and obscured parts of the land that had changed little over many centuries."
—Rev. Al Sandalow, Pastor, First Presbyterian Church, Ellensburg, Washington

The Uniqueness of this Collection:

Continuous Presence: David Bivin was not a tourist to Israel, but he has lived there continuously since 1963. He was there to photograph historic archaeological excavations in progress, view military parades, and experience the cycle of holidays every year. Bivin’s presence in the land allowed him to get photographs that an intermittent visitor likely does not have the opportunity to take.

Dramatic Moments: Living in Jerusalem enabled Bivin to photograph such fascinating events as the aftermath of the capture of the Old City of Jerusalem in 1967, the Independence Day celebration of 1968 when Israel paraded military hardware captured from its enemies, and the mourning procession for Egyptian president Nasser in 1970. Bivin was present at the Western Wall when the prayer plaza was being created. He was on the scene when crates of Jordanian ammunition were being removed from the Citadel of David. He caught on film the streams of Israelis finally able to visit the most ancient parts of the Holy City, off-limits to them during the decades of Arab control.


Jaffa Gate shortly after the capture of the Old City, July 1967

Photographic Skill: Though not a professional photographer, Bivin had a high-quality, medium-format camera and he took extensive photographs throughout the 1960s. His detailed notes allow each photograph to be easily identified, including the exact date on which the photograph was taken.

Knowledge: First a student and then a teacher of historical geography and archaeology, Bivin traveled to major sites all over Israel, and the East and West Banks of Jordan. He photographed ongoing excavations at Megiddo, Ashdod, Masada, Arad, and Gezer. He led groups to rarely-visited sites such as Dothan, Tirzah, Shiloh, Gophna, Tell el-Hesi, Tell Jemmeh, Mamre, Beit Zeitha, and Jebel Qaaqir.

Robinson's Arch, Temple Mount, 1968

Color Photographs: These are among the earliest color photographs taken in Israel.

Friends: Bivin knew and photographed many people who have left a legacy in the fields of historical geography and biblical archaeology, including Nelson Glueck, Abraham Malamat, Yohanan Aharoni, Ephraim Stern, Avraham Negev, Gabriel Barkay, and Anson Rainey.

"For those who are interested in Israel, archaeology, and history, this CD offers an enlightening glimpse of numerous sites as they looked 40 years ago. Four decades of excavations and life in Israel has greatly changed the appearance of numerous locations of biblical significance and this CD allows us to see those places before those changes took place. This CD gives us another tool to help people better understand the Bible in light of its connection with the geography and topography of the land of promise."


Watch the video: 536: The Worst Year In History. Catastrophe. Timeline