History of Diana - History

History of Diana - History

Diana

Merchant name retained.

Diana, a side wheel merchant steamer, was captured by the U.S. Navy 27 April 1862 at New Orleans, La., and turned over on 7 May to General B. Butler, the Army commander of that area. She was employed by the Army mainly as a transport until November 1862 when she was returned for naval service, Acting Master Weeks in command.

Diana served with other ships of the Navy and detachments of the Army in Berwick Bay, La., until 28 March 1863 when she was captured by the Confederates while on a reconnaissance in Grand Lake and Atchafalaya River in Louisiana. During her short naval career she assisted in the capture of two cargo vessels with sugar and molasses on board on 6 December 1862, and took part in an attack on the Confederate forces in Bayou Teche, La., and the destruction of CSS J. A. Cotton 14 January 1863.


Diana, princess of Wales

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Diana, princess of Wales, original name Diana Frances Spencer, (born July 1, 1961, Sandringham, Norfolk, England—died August 31, 1997, Paris, France), former consort (1981–96) of Charles, prince of Wales mother of the heir second in line to the British throne, Prince William, duke of Cambridge (born 1982) and one of the foremost celebrities of her day.

Where was Diana, princess of Wales, born and raised?

Diana was born at Park House, the home that her parents rented on Queen Elizabeth II’s estate at Sandringham and where Diana’s childhood playmates were the queen’s younger sons, Prince Andrew and Prince Edward. Diana was the third child and youngest daughter of parents who belonged to the British nobility.

Who was Diana, princess of Wales?

Diana, princess of Wales, was the former consort (1981–96) of Charles, prince of Wales the mother of the heir second in line to the British throne, Prince William, duke of Cambridge (born 1982) and one of the foremost celebrities of her day.

What was Diana, princess of Wales, known for?

Diana, princess of Wales, was known for her natural charm and charisma and for using her celebrity status to aid charitable causes. Diana’s unprecedented popularity both in Britain and abroad continued after her divorce from Charles, prince of Wales. Her death, in a car accident in 1997, was followed by unprecedented expressions of public mourning.


Charles and Diana divorce

After four years of separation, Charles, Prince of Wales and heir to the British throne, and his wife, Princess Diana, formally divorce.

On July 29, 1981, nearly one billion television viewers in 74 countries tuned in to witness the marriage of Prince Charles, heir to the British throne, to Lady Diana Spencer, a young English schoolteacher. Married in a grand ceremony at St. Paul’s Cathedral in the presence of 2,650 guests, the couple’s romance was, for the moment, the envy of the world. Their first child, Prince William, was born in 1982, and their second, Prince Harry, in 1984.

Before long, however, the fairy tale couple grew apart, an experience that was particularly painful under the ubiquitous eyes of the world’s tabloid media. Diana and Charles announced a separation in 1992, though they continued to carry out their royal duties. In August 1996, two months after Queen Elizabeth II urged the couple to divorce, the prince and princess reached a final agreement. In exchange for a generous settlement, and the right to retain her apartments at Kensington Palace and her title of “Princess of Wales,” Diana agreed to relinquish the title of “Her Royal Highness” and any future claims to the British throne.

In the year following the divorce, the popular princess seemed well on her way to achieving her dream of becoming 𠇊 queen in people’s hearts,” but on August 31, 1997, she was killed with her companion Dodi Fayed in a car accident in Paris. An investigation conducted by the French police concluded that the driver, who also died in the crash, was heavily intoxicated and caused the accident while trying to escape the paparazzi photographers who consistently tailed Diana during any public outing.


Diana History

I was over at the Diana website (the German one) and I looked at the company history. Quite an old company interesting to note they left out any mention of the companies history from 1930 to 1947. My uncles on my mothers side fought on the Russian front as did my Grandfather. So the fact that the company made training air rifles for the wermacht would be very interesting to me.

Do any of you folks have any Air rifles from that period? I can't imagine they don't exist.

Jul 29, 2008 #2 2008-07-29T09:56

Jul 29, 2008 #3 2008-07-29T15:36

The WWII years can be very sketchy when researching manufacturers in Germany. Industry was a primary target for the Allies and, as a result, factories were destroyed or hastily relocated and the associated records lost. Insofar as I can determine, Diana rifles can be broken down into pre-WWII and post-WWII and that's about it. I've seen the occasional Mars bb trainers offered but never have come across a Diana. As to German military trainers, there is a LOT of confusion and misinformation. To illustrate, many .22lr guns such as "pre-war" Mausers and Walthers are routinely listed as trainers when they were, actually, sporters. Even the DSM34, which was made to mimmick a K98 to a fair degree, was still largely a domestic sporting rifle. (Germany had many civilian clubs which employed military-styled rifles.) Also, around 1939, Germany changed their safety proof marks from letters surmounted by a crown to Nazi eagles. This leads many to mistakenly believe the eagle stamps are military inspector acceptance marks. If you are looking for a genuine trainer, you might be better off finding a Mauser KKW trainer which I think was produced for this purpose. Again, that is a .22lr gun and not an air rifle. But be prepared to pay handsomely as these command a VERY hefty premium.

Regarding the Mars-type trainers, they appear to be lead bb guns wherein cocking the bolt compresses a coil spring. Those are likely what your relatives would have trained on. I don't think Diana ever made such a model but they might have.

Here's a thought: If you pick up a pre-war Diana (say a 27, which is a nice model), you might, conceivably, have a rifle that one of your family members would have used, say in a club. And I just remembered there is a pre-war Model 30 (?), an under-lever that looks military. That certainly would have been a choice for one of the civilian organizations. I would ask about those two models over on the American Vintage Airgun site. Lots of collectors there.

Best of luck, in any event.

Jul 30, 2008 #4 2008-07-30T00:04

Actually, there is nothing wrong with discussing WWII history here! I own the place and feel that overlooking such an intresting historical topic would be a disservice to all who wish to learn the company's history as completelly as possible. Finding a specimin would be a real milestone in sorting out the jumbled history of this manufacturer! This Forum is completelly independent of the Factory and it has NO ties to it. This place exhists because of airgunners and their love, admiration and fascination with the Brand.

&nbspSadly, Diana has not kept very good trqack of it's own model numbering system and has never disclosed the reason pre and post war model numbers were re-issued to different models! It makes for a really tough go, trying to sort out thespecifications and values (for instance The Blue Bookof&nbspValues). Those of us who worked with Dr. Beeman on the Blue Book projects, spent many hours attempting to sort it all out. What is a real pity is that the Factory did not save it's own Brochures and literature. Internally, the Factory is lost! Evidentlly when employees retired or left service, the "Secrets" went with them! One would think thaqt since the company&nbsphas been&nbspgenerally a "Family run" orginazation, that a simple phone call or letter coulod have saved the mixed-up series of models. Oddly no effort was made though.

&nbspTo discover more pre-WWII and WWII information would be a treat! Funding a specimen could be sinilar to a minor Rosetta Stone!

&nbspPlease, don't feel that we should avoid posting any historical information! Just maybe we could one day sort this mess out. No offenses will be felt, believe me!

Jul 30, 2008 #5 2008-07-30T02:24

The WWII years can be very sketchy when researching manufacturers in Germany. Industry was a primary target for the Allies and, as a result, factories were destroyed or hastily relocated and the associated records lost. Insofar as I can determine, Diana rifles can be broken down into pre-WWII and post-WWII and that's about it. I've seen the occasional Mars bb trainers offered but never have come across a Diana. As to German military trainers, there is a LOT of confusion and misinformation. To illustrate, many .22lr guns such as "pre-war" Mausers and Walthers are routinely listed as trainers when they were, actually, sporters. Even the DSM34, which was made to mimmick a K98 to a fair degree, was still largely a domestic sporting rifle. (Germany had many civilian clubs which employed military-styled rifles.) Also, around 1939, Germany changed their safety proof marks from letters surmounted by a crown to Nazi eagles. This leads many to mistakenly believe the eagle stamps are military inspector acceptance marks. If you are looking for a genuine trainer, you might be better off finding a Mauser KKW trainer which I think was produced for this purpose. Again, that is a .22lr gun and not an air rifle. But be prepared to pay handsomely as these command a VERY hefty premium.

Regarding the Mars-type trainers, they appear to be lead bb guns wherein cocking the bolt compresses a coil spring. Those are likely what your relatives would have trained on. I don't think Diana ever made such a model but they might have.

Here's a thought: If you pick up a pre-war Diana (say a 27, which is a nice model), you might, conceivably, have a rifle that one of your family members would have used, say in a club. And I just remembered there is a pre-war Model 30 (?), an under-lever that looks military. That certainly would have been a choice for one of the civilian organizations. I would ask about those two models over on the American Vintage Airgun site. Lots of collectors there.

Best of luck, in any event.

Hi Roy, Johannis, and Sir Feather!!

Here is a little "Diana" related info that might be of some interest:

Diana is a German airgun firm with a long, colorful history dating back to 1890-1891. Amazingly enough, the company survived through WWI and WWII and numerous tremendous civil upheavals the German economy had suffered several crushing depressions and yet, the company endured. In the United States, Diana was so closely associated with RWS of N.J. that many people believe RWS makes the airguns, and some still do, but such is not the case. Diana makes them, and RWS simply imported them into this country under their own label until they went "belly-up" and were acuired by Umarex Sportwaffen GmbH & Co. KG. (who's US presence is Umarex USA).

The model 27 was first made in 1910-1911, and those early models can be easily identified as they only had a buttstock and did not possess a forearm at all until after World War II when the model 27 got a refit with a somewhat more conventional stock as we know it today.

The Diana model 27 has been sold in this country under several names - a few of the important ones are Beeman, Original, Hy-Score, Winchester and Milbro. All but Milbro were actually German Diana model 27 guns under other names.

The Milbro guns deserve more explanation due to the fact that as partial reparations for World War II, the United Kingdom secured the rights, tooling, machinery, parts and drawings of Diana air rifles. Millard Brothers of London made Diana guns in Scotland that were also sold in the U.S. under the Daisy brand name, although they never made the model 27 for Daisy. During the years when Milbro made Dianas, the restarted German firm had to use the name "Original" to avoid confusion. After Milbro folded, the Germans got back the Diana name and many times yet today you will see Dianas, or parts, or parts schematics that will still say "Original".

Here are some pictures of a PRE WWII Diana 27










Hey Sir Feather or Johannis.

Here are some interesting Dianas - I believe the model 30 is circa 1940s (I could be wrong) - I think that the Model 55 was 1950 - 1978. I was wondering to myself if they could have been "trainers".

Diana Model 55


Transforming Nottingham House

In 1689, the King and Queen commissioned Sir Christopher Wren to draw up plans, but the Queen herself, excited by the project, took charge of the project to transform this little house into a palace.

Enthusiastic Mary made regular visits to check on progress and to hurry the work along. While a huge workforce was labouring with the building, a team of designers were already preparing decorative schemes for the new rooms.

However, Mary’s urging on the workmen had disastrous consequences. In November 1689 part of a newly-built wall collapsed. One man was killed and others badly injured. It happened minutes after the Queen had toured the site. A shaken Mary wrote to her husband of the incident: ‘It shewed me the hand of God plainly in it, and I was truly humbled'.

Despite the setback, the palace was soon finished, and the King and Queen moved in on Christmas Eve 1689.

The party palace

William and Mary began an era of magnificent balls in a golden three-year period, beginning in 1691. They used their new ornate rooms, elegant staircases and impressive halls to great effect. Guests ate, drank, gambled and flirted until dawn.

Once or twice a week the King and Queen held Drawing Rooms, where they mingled with distinguished visitors such as ambassadors or foreign princes.

Image: The Drawing Room was the focal point of court life where the king would meet members of the court, dressed in their finery.


June 21, 1982: Prince William is born

Both Charles and Diana are delighted by the arrival of their son, though afterward, Diana suffers from postpartum depression.

March 1983: Royal tour of Australia and New Zealand

Charles and Diana, along with Prince William, visit Australia and New Zealand. Most of the attention and adulation is directed at Diana, while a jealous Charles is relegated to the background. One security officer describes the reaction to Diana as "more akin to Beatlemania."


Before The Royal Family

Princess Diana was born Diana Frances Spencer on July 1, 1961 at Park House, the home her parents rented on the British royal family&aposs estate at Sandringham. Her parents were Edward John and Frances Spencer Viscount and Viscountess Althorp, later Earl and Countess Spencer. Diana had two older sisters, Sarah and Jane, and a younger brother, Charles. When she was 6 her parents split up and her mother got married to businessman, Peter Shand-Kydd. Diana&aposs father received custody of the children. In 1975 he became the eighth Earl Spencer, making Diana a Lady. Diana and her siblings moved to Althorp, the Spencer family estate in Northampton.

The Spencer children continued to see their mother regularly and often spent school holidays at Frances&apos new home in the north-west of Scotland. As was the custom among the aristocracy at the time, when she was about 8 Diana was sent off to boarding school first at Riddlesworth Hall and later to West Heath Girls School in Kent.

Earl Spencer&aposs second marriage to Raine, formerly Countess of Dartmouth and daughter of the romantic novelist Barbara Cartland, and a colourful and strong headed character, did not meet with the approval of his children, and it was never to be a peaceful household. On her arrival &aposRaine stopped play&apos was caustically entered into the visitor book at Althrop.

Diana never enjoyed the academic life and on leaving school at sixteen without a single &aposO&apos level was enrolled at a Swiss finishing school, the Institut Alpin Vidamenette. She suffered terrible homesickness, and after two weeks of pleading letters her parents allowed her to return, and her indulgent father bought her a London flat, which she shared with friends.

As she had always been fond of children, she embarked on a career first as a nanny and later as a nursery assistant at the Young England Kindergarten in Pimlico, London. It was here that she first attracted the attention of the British Press.

Schooldays with her brother

Teenage Diana studied ballet

Diana, the children&aposs nanny, in 1980


Neither Princess Diana nor Meghan Markle were afraid of calling out the royal family

According to The Cut, the press office of the royal family is notoriously quiet about everything from rifts between family members to alleged affairs. In rare cases, they'll flat-out deny rumors, but you'll hardly see a royal express a negative opinion.

In some ways, it seems like you get indoctrinated into the royal family by metaphorically stitching your mouth shut (or, more literally, deleting your social media accounts), but Princess Diana was actually remarkably candid about certain gossip. In a 1995 BBC interview, the star outrageously admitted that Prince Charles' affair led to the dissolution of their marriage. "Well, there were three of us in this marriage, so it was a bit crowded," she said.

Diana's candid demeanor opened up the doors for Meghan Markle, who isn't afraid to use her voice, particularly now that she's hung up her royal title and signed a multi-year podcasting deal with Spotify. In a bombshell interview with Oprah Winfrey, the star went as far as directly accusing the royal family of "perpetuating falsehoods" about her family. Beyond that, Markle is using her voice for change. In 2019, the star guest-edited an issue of British Vogue titled "Forces for Change," which was met with an onslaught of public scrutiny as it touched on topics like climate change, LGBTQ visibility, racism, and body acceptance.


All4shooters.com / all4hunters.com - International website for sports shooters and hunters

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The Truth About Princess Diana&rsquos Sapphire Engagement Ring

The stunning 12-carat Ceylon sapphire and diamond ring was actually a catalogue item.

The most important thing you need to know about the history of Princess Diana&rsquos engagement ring is that there is very little of it. That twelve carat Ceylon sapphire surrounded by fourteen solitaire diamonds was a catalogue item.

There were not royal stones involved, as there had been when Prince Philip proposed to Queen Elizabeth with a ring created from diamonds on one of his mother&rsquos tiaras. No private commissions from royal jewelers occurred&mdashas they have for centuries&mdashand as they did even just a few years ago when Shaun Leane designed Princess Beatrice&rsquos engagement ring.

And yet, Princess Diana&rsquos pret-a-porter ring became a symbol of history. In fact, when I asked jewelry experts to contribute ideas for my latest book, Jewels That Made History, her ring was on every single one of their lists. It may have been this jewel that first marked her desire for independence.

To be fair, sapphires&mdashlong a stone of kings and a symbol of devotion and integrity&mdashhave always been a royal engagement ring stone of choice. When Lady Elizabeth&mdashbetter known to us as the Queen Mother&mdashsaid "yes" to the Duke of York (later King George VI) in 1923, the agreement was sealed with an oval shaped sapphire. And Princess Anne, too, wore the precious blue stone when she announced her engagement to Mark Phillips in 1973. Anne chose another sapphire, a cabochon cut, for her second marriage in 1986. Princess Alexandra of Kent&rsquos ring? Yes, sapphire.

So how did Princess Diana&rsquos ring actually break from what seems like a longstanding tradition? And why did her choice allegedly ignite royal criticism?

By all accounts it was the modern ease of her selection. The ring she chose&mdashwhich of course now belongs to her daughter in law, Kate Middleton&mdashfrom the Asprey catalogue was a stock item, not a bespoke piece, which meant that it could also be available to anyone else who might have $60,000 to spare.

The ring is in keeping with Diana&rsquos insistence of creating her own narrative within the royal family

For me, however, it has always been perfectly in keeping with Diana&rsquos insistence of creating her own narrative within the royal story, and her legendary rebellious streak. Remember when she wore Queen Mary&rsquos emerald and diamond choker as a headband to dance with her husband Charles, Prince of Wales during an official tour of Australia? And, as the People&rsquos Princess, why wouldn&rsquot she choose a ring that was&mdashtechnically&mdashavailable to all?


Watch the video: Lights Out: The History of Diana Walter. Horror History